Quality of medication records and use of pharmacy resources in community residential care facilities

Shelly L. Gray, Peggy S. Odegard, Anne E B Sales, Heather M Young, Jean H. Sullivan, Susan C. Hedrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In community residential care (CRC) facilities, medication administration is often performed by unlicensed personnel with minimal knowledge in medication use. Medication management is one of the top 3 quality-of-care issues facing these facilities. OBJECTIVE: To examine the type of medication assistance residents received, determine the proportion of facilities that used pharmacy resources, and examine the quality of facility medication records in CRC facilities (eg, adult family homes, adult residential care, assisted living facilities). METHODS: Baseline in-person interviews were conducted with 349 residents and 299 facility providers in the Puget Sound region of Washington. Information was also obtained from facility medication records at enrollment and state databases. A pharmacist determined quality of the records using a standardized form. RESULTS: The average resident was a 78-year-old white female taking 7 drugs. Medication records that were computer generated were significantly less likely to have misspelled names of drugs and errors in or absence of dose, directions for use, and route of administration. Overall, 26.3% of facilities reported that a consultant pharmacist reviewed residents' medication lists, 52.0% reported the use of preprinted lists, and 75.6% received prepackaged medications from the pharmacy. Adult family homes, the smallest facility type, were the least likely to use pharmacy-related services. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of handwritten medication records was a concern in CRC facilities. These facilities may benefit from services offered by pharmacies that may enhance medication management, many of which were underutilized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-899
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Pharmacotherapy
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Residential Facilities
Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacists
Assisted Living Facilities
Quality of Health Care
Consultants
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Names
Databases
Interviews

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Community residential care
  • Medication management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Quality of medication records and use of pharmacy resources in community residential care facilities. / Gray, Shelly L.; Odegard, Peggy S.; Sales, Anne E B; Young, Heather M; Sullivan, Jean H.; Hedrick, Susan C.

In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 40, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 894-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, Shelly L. ; Odegard, Peggy S. ; Sales, Anne E B ; Young, Heather M ; Sullivan, Jean H. ; Hedrick, Susan C. / Quality of medication records and use of pharmacy resources in community residential care facilities. In: Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2006 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 894-899.
@article{4fe68f8f648c4334b84bd926772d896a,
title = "Quality of medication records and use of pharmacy resources in community residential care facilities",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In community residential care (CRC) facilities, medication administration is often performed by unlicensed personnel with minimal knowledge in medication use. Medication management is one of the top 3 quality-of-care issues facing these facilities. OBJECTIVE: To examine the type of medication assistance residents received, determine the proportion of facilities that used pharmacy resources, and examine the quality of facility medication records in CRC facilities (eg, adult family homes, adult residential care, assisted living facilities). METHODS: Baseline in-person interviews were conducted with 349 residents and 299 facility providers in the Puget Sound region of Washington. Information was also obtained from facility medication records at enrollment and state databases. A pharmacist determined quality of the records using a standardized form. RESULTS: The average resident was a 78-year-old white female taking 7 drugs. Medication records that were computer generated were significantly less likely to have misspelled names of drugs and errors in or absence of dose, directions for use, and route of administration. Overall, 26.3{\%} of facilities reported that a consultant pharmacist reviewed residents' medication lists, 52.0{\%} reported the use of preprinted lists, and 75.6{\%} received prepackaged medications from the pharmacy. Adult family homes, the smallest facility type, were the least likely to use pharmacy-related services. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of handwritten medication records was a concern in CRC facilities. These facilities may benefit from services offered by pharmacies that may enhance medication management, many of which were underutilized.",
keywords = "Cohort study, Community residential care, Medication management",
author = "Gray, {Shelly L.} and Odegard, {Peggy S.} and Sales, {Anne E B} and Young, {Heather M} and Sullivan, {Jean H.} and Hedrick, {Susan C.}",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1345/aph.1G585",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "894--899",
journal = "Annals of Pharmacotherapy",
issn = "1060-0280",
publisher = "Harvey Whitney Books Company",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of medication records and use of pharmacy resources in community residential care facilities

AU - Gray, Shelly L.

AU - Odegard, Peggy S.

AU - Sales, Anne E B

AU - Young, Heather M

AU - Sullivan, Jean H.

AU - Hedrick, Susan C.

PY - 2006/5

Y1 - 2006/5

N2 - BACKGROUND: In community residential care (CRC) facilities, medication administration is often performed by unlicensed personnel with minimal knowledge in medication use. Medication management is one of the top 3 quality-of-care issues facing these facilities. OBJECTIVE: To examine the type of medication assistance residents received, determine the proportion of facilities that used pharmacy resources, and examine the quality of facility medication records in CRC facilities (eg, adult family homes, adult residential care, assisted living facilities). METHODS: Baseline in-person interviews were conducted with 349 residents and 299 facility providers in the Puget Sound region of Washington. Information was also obtained from facility medication records at enrollment and state databases. A pharmacist determined quality of the records using a standardized form. RESULTS: The average resident was a 78-year-old white female taking 7 drugs. Medication records that were computer generated were significantly less likely to have misspelled names of drugs and errors in or absence of dose, directions for use, and route of administration. Overall, 26.3% of facilities reported that a consultant pharmacist reviewed residents' medication lists, 52.0% reported the use of preprinted lists, and 75.6% received prepackaged medications from the pharmacy. Adult family homes, the smallest facility type, were the least likely to use pharmacy-related services. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of handwritten medication records was a concern in CRC facilities. These facilities may benefit from services offered by pharmacies that may enhance medication management, many of which were underutilized.

AB - BACKGROUND: In community residential care (CRC) facilities, medication administration is often performed by unlicensed personnel with minimal knowledge in medication use. Medication management is one of the top 3 quality-of-care issues facing these facilities. OBJECTIVE: To examine the type of medication assistance residents received, determine the proportion of facilities that used pharmacy resources, and examine the quality of facility medication records in CRC facilities (eg, adult family homes, adult residential care, assisted living facilities). METHODS: Baseline in-person interviews were conducted with 349 residents and 299 facility providers in the Puget Sound region of Washington. Information was also obtained from facility medication records at enrollment and state databases. A pharmacist determined quality of the records using a standardized form. RESULTS: The average resident was a 78-year-old white female taking 7 drugs. Medication records that were computer generated were significantly less likely to have misspelled names of drugs and errors in or absence of dose, directions for use, and route of administration. Overall, 26.3% of facilities reported that a consultant pharmacist reviewed residents' medication lists, 52.0% reported the use of preprinted lists, and 75.6% received prepackaged medications from the pharmacy. Adult family homes, the smallest facility type, were the least likely to use pharmacy-related services. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of handwritten medication records was a concern in CRC facilities. These facilities may benefit from services offered by pharmacies that may enhance medication management, many of which were underutilized.

KW - Cohort study

KW - Community residential care

KW - Medication management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646758157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646758157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1345/aph.1G585

DO - 10.1345/aph.1G585

M3 - Article

C2 - 16638918

AN - SCOPUS:33646758157

VL - 40

SP - 894

EP - 899

JO - Annals of Pharmacotherapy

JF - Annals of Pharmacotherapy

SN - 1060-0280

IS - 5

ER -