Quality assessment in worksite health promotion

Kenneth W Kizer, L. F. Folkers, P. G. Felten, D. Neimeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid expansion of worksite health promotion programs and the proliferation of service providers have resulted in increased concern about the quality of such programs. And while employers may view health promotion programs as a service to be purchased, in general, quality standards, price, and outcomes are less well established for primary prevention programs than for other medical services. This trend creates substantial potential for inappropriate expenditures, undermining the general credibility of such programs. Recognizing the limits of epidemiologic data and the potential for misuse of health promotion activities in the workplace, the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) undertook the development of guidelines for employers' use in assessing the quality of the numerous employee health promotion or chronic disease risk reduction programs available to them. To make the use of such programs as productive as possible, the CDHS developed recommendations in two main areas: (1) general recommendations for six fundamental program planning and development activities that underlie sound health promotion programs, and (2) specific criteria for seven types of health promotion programs commonly implemented in work settings. Optimally, worksite-based health promotion programs should be part of a comprehensive effort that provides for appropriate medical oversight, referral, and follow-up procedures. These programs should be complemented by appropriate changes in the work environment and in organizational policies. Programs should also include strategies to assist employees in initiating healthier behaviors and maintaining the new behaviors once they are established. Preventive medicine and occupational medicine practitioners and medical directors should be familiar with the issues addressed by these recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-127
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume8
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992

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Health Promotion
Workplace
Health Services
Organizational Policy
Physician Executives
Preventive Medicine
Occupational Medicine
Occupational Health
Risk Reduction Behavior
Primary Prevention
Health Expenditures
Chronic Disease
Referral and Consultation
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kizer, K. W., Folkers, L. F., Felten, P. G., & Neimeyer, D. (1992). Quality assessment in worksite health promotion. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 8(2), 123-127.

Quality assessment in worksite health promotion. / Kizer, Kenneth W; Folkers, L. F.; Felten, P. G.; Neimeyer, D.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 2, 1992, p. 123-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kizer, KW, Folkers, LF, Felten, PG & Neimeyer, D 1992, 'Quality assessment in worksite health promotion', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 123-127.
Kizer, Kenneth W ; Folkers, L. F. ; Felten, P. G. ; Neimeyer, D. / Quality assessment in worksite health promotion. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 123-127.
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