Psychosocial influences in onset and progression of late life disability

Carlos F. Mendes De Leon, Kumar Rajan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives.Disability in older age has been related to several psychosocial characteristics, including social networks, social engagement, and depression. However, the exact role of these characteristics in the disablement process remains uncertain.Method.Data come from a population-based study of black and white adults aged ≥65 years (N = 5,306), with up to 9 yearly data on the primary outcome measure, activities of daily living (ADL) disability. We use a two-part regression model to simultaneously test the association between each psychosocial characteristic and both onset and progression of ADL disability, while controlling for demographic variables, education, and mode of interview in the first model and health status variables in the second model.Results.Social networks were negatively associated with onset of ADL disability but not associated with progression. The association became non-significant after adjustment for health status. Social engagement was negatively associated with both onset and progression of disability, even after adjustment for health status. Depression was significantly associated with onset of disability after adjustment for health status but not with progression of disability.Discussion. The results suggest a differential role for psychosocial characteristics in the disablement process, with generally stronger associations for transitions to onset of ADL disability than progression of ADL disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-302
Number of pages16
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Activities of Daily Living
disability
Health Status
health status
Social Support
social network
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews
Education
Population
regression
interview

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Social engagement
  • Social networks
  • Statistical methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Psychosocial influences in onset and progression of late life disability. / Mendes De Leon, Carlos F.; Rajan, Kumar.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, Vol. 69, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 287-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9f084cc3b0f746bdbdb053391ba1ebfd,
title = "Psychosocial influences in onset and progression of late life disability",
abstract = "Objectives.Disability in older age has been related to several psychosocial characteristics, including social networks, social engagement, and depression. However, the exact role of these characteristics in the disablement process remains uncertain.Method.Data come from a population-based study of black and white adults aged ≥65 years (N = 5,306), with up to 9 yearly data on the primary outcome measure, activities of daily living (ADL) disability. We use a two-part regression model to simultaneously test the association between each psychosocial characteristic and both onset and progression of ADL disability, while controlling for demographic variables, education, and mode of interview in the first model and health status variables in the second model.Results.Social networks were negatively associated with onset of ADL disability but not associated with progression. The association became non-significant after adjustment for health status. Social engagement was negatively associated with both onset and progression of disability, even after adjustment for health status. Depression was significantly associated with onset of disability after adjustment for health status but not with progression of disability.Discussion. The results suggest a differential role for psychosocial characteristics in the disablement process, with generally stronger associations for transitions to onset of ADL disability than progression of ADL disability.",
keywords = "Depression, Disability, Social engagement, Social networks, Statistical methods",
author = "{Mendes De Leon}, {Carlos F.} and Kumar Rajan",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/geronb/gbt130",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "287--302",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences",
issn = "1079-5014",
publisher = "Gerontological Society of America",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychosocial influences in onset and progression of late life disability

AU - Mendes De Leon, Carlos F.

AU - Rajan, Kumar

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objectives.Disability in older age has been related to several psychosocial characteristics, including social networks, social engagement, and depression. However, the exact role of these characteristics in the disablement process remains uncertain.Method.Data come from a population-based study of black and white adults aged ≥65 years (N = 5,306), with up to 9 yearly data on the primary outcome measure, activities of daily living (ADL) disability. We use a two-part regression model to simultaneously test the association between each psychosocial characteristic and both onset and progression of ADL disability, while controlling for demographic variables, education, and mode of interview in the first model and health status variables in the second model.Results.Social networks were negatively associated with onset of ADL disability but not associated with progression. The association became non-significant after adjustment for health status. Social engagement was negatively associated with both onset and progression of disability, even after adjustment for health status. Depression was significantly associated with onset of disability after adjustment for health status but not with progression of disability.Discussion. The results suggest a differential role for psychosocial characteristics in the disablement process, with generally stronger associations for transitions to onset of ADL disability than progression of ADL disability.

AB - Objectives.Disability in older age has been related to several psychosocial characteristics, including social networks, social engagement, and depression. However, the exact role of these characteristics in the disablement process remains uncertain.Method.Data come from a population-based study of black and white adults aged ≥65 years (N = 5,306), with up to 9 yearly data on the primary outcome measure, activities of daily living (ADL) disability. We use a two-part regression model to simultaneously test the association between each psychosocial characteristic and both onset and progression of ADL disability, while controlling for demographic variables, education, and mode of interview in the first model and health status variables in the second model.Results.Social networks were negatively associated with onset of ADL disability but not associated with progression. The association became non-significant after adjustment for health status. Social engagement was negatively associated with both onset and progression of disability, even after adjustment for health status. Depression was significantly associated with onset of disability after adjustment for health status but not with progression of disability.Discussion. The results suggest a differential role for psychosocial characteristics in the disablement process, with generally stronger associations for transitions to onset of ADL disability than progression of ADL disability.

KW - Depression

KW - Disability

KW - Social engagement

KW - Social networks

KW - Statistical methods

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894287058&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894287058&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/geronb/gbt130

DO - 10.1093/geronb/gbt130

M3 - Article

C2 - 24389123

AN - SCOPUS:84894287058

VL - 69

SP - 287

EP - 302

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

SN - 1079-5014

IS - 2

ER -