Psychosocial factors and preterm birth among African American and white women in central North Carolina

Nancy Dole, David A. Savitz, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Michael J. McMahon, Pierre Buekens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We assessed associations between psychosocial factors and preterm birth, stratified by race in a prospective cohort study. Methods. We surveyed 1898 women who used university and public health prenatal clinics regarding various psychosocial factors. Results. African Americans were at higher risk of preterm birth if they used distancing from problems as a coping mechanism or reported racial discrimination. Whites were at higher risk if they had high counts of negative life events or were not living with a partner. The association of pregnancy-related anxiety with preterm birth weakened when medical comorbidities were taken into account. No association with preterm birth was found for depression, general social support, or church attendance. Conclusions. Some associations between psychosocial variables and preterm birth differed by race.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1358-1365
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume94
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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