Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline

Peter P. Vitaliano, Joyce Yi, Paul E M Phillips, Diana Echeverria, Heather M Young, Ilene C. Siegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined relationships between chronic stress and cognitive decline and whether such relationships were mediated by psychophysiological factors. Ninety-six caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were compared with 95 similar noncaregiver spouses. All were free of diabetes. Although the groups started similarly, over 2 years caregivers declined by a small but significant amount (1 raw score point and 4 percentile points, each p < .05) on Shipley Vocabulary. In contrast, noncaregivers did not change. Higher hostile attribution (β = -.09;p < .05) and metabolic risk (β = -.10; p < .05) in caregivers mediated the cognitive decline. This is the first study of cognitive decline and mediators in caregivers. This work has implications for caregiver and care-recipient health and for research on cognition, psychophysiology, diabetes, and AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-411
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Alzheimer Disease
Psychophysiology
Vocabulary
Health Services Research
Spouses
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Cognition
  • Hostility
  • Metabolic
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Vitaliano, P. P., Yi, J., Phillips, P. E. M., Echeverria, D., Young, H. M., & Siegler, I. C. (2005). Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline. Psychology and Aging, 20(3), 402-411. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.20.3.402

Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline. / Vitaliano, Peter P.; Yi, Joyce; Phillips, Paul E M; Echeverria, Diana; Young, Heather M; Siegler, Ilene C.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 20, No. 3, 09.2005, p. 402-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vitaliano, PP, Yi, J, Phillips, PEM, Echeverria, D, Young, HM & Siegler, IC 2005, 'Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline', Psychology and Aging, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 402-411. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.20.3.402
Vitaliano, Peter P. ; Yi, Joyce ; Phillips, Paul E M ; Echeverria, Diana ; Young, Heather M ; Siegler, Ilene C. / Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline. In: Psychology and Aging. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 402-411.
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