Psychometric scatter in retarded, autistic preschoolers as measured by the Cattell.

M. A. McDonald, Peter Clive Mundy, C. Kasari, M. Sigman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether psychometric scatter is characteristic of the developmental profile of young autistic children, the performance of 38 autistic children, as measured by the Cattell, was compared with the performance of MA matched samples of normal, Down's Syndrome and non-Down's Syndrome children with mental retardation. Results indicated significantly more psychometric scatter in the autistic group than in the other groups. Similarly, 66% of the autistic children vs 13, 26 and 32% of the normal, Down's and non-Down's samples, respectively, had significant scatter. Further analyses revealed that autistic children showed consistent relative strength in non-language and weakness in language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-604
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume30
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1989

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Psychometrics
Down Syndrome
Intellectual Disability
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Psychometric scatter in retarded, autistic preschoolers as measured by the Cattell. / McDonald, M. A.; Mundy, Peter Clive; Kasari, C.; Sigman, M.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 30, No. 4, 07.1989, p. 599-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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