Psoriasis and metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

April W. Armstrong, Caitlin T. Harskamp, Ehrin J. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

188 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasing population-based studies have suggested a relationship between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome. Objective: The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis that synthesizes the epidemiologic associations between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome. Methods: We searched for observational studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register from Jan 1, 1980 to Jan 1, 2012. We applied the Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines in the conduct of this study. Results: We identified 12 observational studies with a total of 1.4 million study participants fulfilling the inclusion criteria, among whom 41,853 were patients with psoriasis. Based on random-effects modeling of cross-sectional and case-controlled studies, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for metabolic syndrome among patients with psoriasis was 2.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-3.01) compared with the general population. Visual inspection of a funnel plot and formal analysis with the Egger test suggested publication bias and absence of small studies in the published literature (P = .03). A dose-response relationship was also observed between psoriasis severity and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Limitations: No studies to date have assessed incidence of metabolic syndrome among patients with psoriasis. Conclusions: Compared with the general population, psoriasis patients have higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and patients with more severe psoriasis have greater odds of metabolic syndrome than those with milder psoriasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)654-662
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Psoriasis
Observational Studies
Meta-Analysis
Population
Publication Bias
MEDLINE
Epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Guidelines
Confidence Intervals
Incidence

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • meta-analysis
  • metabolic syndrome
  • prevalence
  • psoriasis
  • risk factors
  • systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Psoriasis and metabolic syndrome : A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. / Armstrong, April W.; Harskamp, Caitlin T.; Armstrong, Ehrin J.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 68, No. 4, 2013, p. 654-662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, April W. ; Harskamp, Caitlin T. ; Armstrong, Ehrin J. / Psoriasis and metabolic syndrome : A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2013 ; Vol. 68, No. 4. pp. 654-662.
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