Psoriasis and hypertension severity: Results from a case-control study

April W. Armstrong, Steven W. Lin, Cynthia Chambers, Mary E. Sockolov, David L. Chin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Epidemiologic studies have provided new insights into the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases. Previous population studies have examined hypertension frequency in psoriasis patients. However, the relationship between severity of hypertension and psoriasis has not been characterized. Objective: We sought to investigate whether patients with psoriasis have more difficult-to-manage hypertension compared to non-psoriatic hypertensive patients. Approach: We performed a case-control study using the University of California Davis electronic medical records. The cases were defined as patients diagnosed with both psoriasis and hypertension, and controls were defined as patients with hypertension and without psoriasis. In this identified population, 835 cases were matched on age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) to 2418 control patients. Key Results: Treatment with multiple anti-hypertensives was significantly associated with the presence of psoriasis using univariate (p<0.0001) and multivariable analysis, after adjusting for diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and race (p<0.0001). Compared to hypertensive patients without psoriasis, psoriasis patients with hypertension were 5 times more likely to be on a monotherapy antihypertensive regimen (95% CI 3.607.05), 9.5 times more likely to be on dual antihypertensive therapy (95% CI 6.68-13.65), 16.5 times more likely to be on triple antihypertensive regimen (95% CI 11.01-24.84), and 19.9 times more likely to be on quadruple therapy or centrally-acting agent (95% CI 10.58-37.33) in multivariable analysis after adjusting for traditional cardiac risk factors. Conclusions: Psoriasis patients appear to have more difficult-to-control hypertension compared to non-psoriatic, hypertensive patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere18227
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

psoriasis
case-control studies
Psoriasis
Antihypertensive Agents
hypertension
Case-Control Studies
Hypertension
antihypertensive agents
Electronic medical equipment
Medical problems
therapeutics
Electronic Health Records
hyperlipidemia
Hyperlipidemias
epidemiological studies
Population
cardiovascular diseases
electronics
body mass index
diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Armstrong, A. W., Lin, S. W., Chambers, C., Sockolov, M. E., & Chin, D. L. (2011). Psoriasis and hypertension severity: Results from a case-control study. PLoS One, 6(3), [e18227]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018227

Psoriasis and hypertension severity : Results from a case-control study. / Armstrong, April W.; Lin, Steven W.; Chambers, Cynthia; Sockolov, Mary E.; Chin, David L.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 3, e18227, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, AW, Lin, SW, Chambers, C, Sockolov, ME & Chin, DL 2011, 'Psoriasis and hypertension severity: Results from a case-control study', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 3, e18227. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018227
Armstrong, April W. ; Lin, Steven W. ; Chambers, Cynthia ; Sockolov, Mary E. ; Chin, David L. / Psoriasis and hypertension severity : Results from a case-control study. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 3.
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