Providing Diverse Trainees an Early and Transparent Introduction to Academic Appointment and Promotion Processes

Edward J Callahan, Michael Banks, Jose Medina, Kenny Disbrow, Maria Soto-Greene, John P. Sánchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The growth in number of medical schools and increased numbers of faculty tracks have combined with evolving criteria for promotion to trigger a call for greater transparency of academic appointment and promotion processes. Most vulnerable to confusion about these changes are first-generation and diverse medical students and residents, the upstream pipeline of the academic medicine workforce. Diverse medical students have expressed diminished interest in academia because of perceived obstacles in appointment and promotion processes. Methods: This workshop was designed to utilize didactics and career reflection exercises to help trainees learn: (1) how to define core terms related to academic appointment and promotion processes, (2) how to compare data elements for different CVs and portfolios, (3) common steps in submitting a promotion package, and (4) that they can immediately begin to document content for academic CVs, portfolios, and promotion packages. Results: One hundred forty-five diverse participants completed an evaluation at eight conferences across the U.S. More than 90% strongly agreed or agreed that the aforementioned objectives were met. Participants commented that the workshop was "illuminating," was "very informative," and "provided an inside look of how faculty are evaluated." Results showed an immediate impact on participants' self-reported confidence to negotiate appointment and promotion processes. Discussion: Increases in self-rated confidence to negotiate appointment and promotion processes may help sustain trainees' interest in becoming future faculty. Further monitoring will be needed to determine if early exposure to these concepts improves probability of seeking, obtaining, and maintaining appointments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalMedEdPORTAL : the journal of teaching and learning resources
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2017

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Appointments and Schedules
Medical Students
Education
Medical Schools
Medicine
Exercise
Growth

Keywords

  • Academic Appointment and Promotion Processes
  • Careers in Academic Medicine
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • Faculty Development

Cite this

Providing Diverse Trainees an Early and Transparent Introduction to Academic Appointment and Promotion Processes. / Callahan, Edward J; Banks, Michael; Medina, Jose; Disbrow, Kenny; Soto-Greene, Maria; Sánchez, John P.

In: MedEdPORTAL : the journal of teaching and learning resources, Vol. 13, 20.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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