Provider smoking cessation advice among California Asian-American smokers

Elisa Tong, Hao Tang, Moon S Chen, Stephen J. McPhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To determine proportions of provider advice to quit smoking for Asian-American smokers and to describe factors that may affect the provision of such advice. Design. Secondary data analysis of population-based survey. Setting. California. Subjects. Current smokers from the California Tobacco Use Surveys for Chinese-Americans (n = 2117, participation rate = 52%), Korean-Americans (n = 2545, participation rate = 48%), and Vietnamese-Americans (n = 2179, participation rate = 63.5%). Measures. Sociodemographics including insurance status, smoking frequency, provider visit in past year, and provider advice to quit. Analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models examined dependent outcomes of (1) provider visit in past year and (2) provider advice to quit. Results. Less than a third (30.5%) of smokers in our study reported both seeing a provider (50.8%) and then receiving advice to quit (60.1%). Factors associated with provider visits included being female, being 45 years or older, having health insurance, and being Vietnamese. Among smokers who saw a provider, factors associated with provider advice to quit included having health insurance and being a daily smoker. Conclusions. Asian-American smokers reported low proportions of provider advice to quit in the past year, largely because only half of smokers saw a provider. Providers who see such smokers may need greater awareness that several effective cessation treatments do not require health insurance, and that intermittent smokers need advice to quit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume25
Issue numberSUPPL.5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Smoking Cessation
health insurance
smoking
Health Insurance
participation
secondary analysis
Logistic Models
insurance
Smoking
nicotine
data analysis
logistics
Withholding Treatment
Insurance Coverage
Tobacco Use
regression
Population

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Cessation
  • Chinese
  • Korean
  • Prevention research
  • Tobacco
  • Vietnamese

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Provider smoking cessation advice among California Asian-American smokers. / Tong, Elisa; Tang, Hao; Chen, Moon S; McPhee, Stephen J.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 25, No. SUPPL.5, 05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c68a578571cc4596bcff707e0feac095,
title = "Provider smoking cessation advice among California Asian-American smokers",
abstract = "Purpose. To determine proportions of provider advice to quit smoking for Asian-American smokers and to describe factors that may affect the provision of such advice. Design. Secondary data analysis of population-based survey. Setting. California. Subjects. Current smokers from the California Tobacco Use Surveys for Chinese-Americans (n = 2117, participation rate = 52{\%}), Korean-Americans (n = 2545, participation rate = 48{\%}), and Vietnamese-Americans (n = 2179, participation rate = 63.5{\%}). Measures. Sociodemographics including insurance status, smoking frequency, provider visit in past year, and provider advice to quit. Analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models examined dependent outcomes of (1) provider visit in past year and (2) provider advice to quit. Results. Less than a third (30.5{\%}) of smokers in our study reported both seeing a provider (50.8{\%}) and then receiving advice to quit (60.1{\%}). Factors associated with provider visits included being female, being 45 years or older, having health insurance, and being Vietnamese. Among smokers who saw a provider, factors associated with provider advice to quit included having health insurance and being a daily smoker. Conclusions. Asian-American smokers reported low proportions of provider advice to quit in the past year, largely because only half of smokers saw a provider. Providers who see such smokers may need greater awareness that several effective cessation treatments do not require health insurance, and that intermittent smokers need advice to quit.",
keywords = "Asian, Cessation, Chinese, Korean, Prevention research, Tobacco, Vietnamese",
author = "Elisa Tong and Hao Tang and Chen, {Moon S} and McPhee, {Stephen J.}",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.4278/ajhp.100611-QUAN-186",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
issn = "0890-1171",
publisher = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
number = "SUPPL.5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Provider smoking cessation advice among California Asian-American smokers

AU - Tong, Elisa

AU - Tang, Hao

AU - Chen, Moon S

AU - McPhee, Stephen J.

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - Purpose. To determine proportions of provider advice to quit smoking for Asian-American smokers and to describe factors that may affect the provision of such advice. Design. Secondary data analysis of population-based survey. Setting. California. Subjects. Current smokers from the California Tobacco Use Surveys for Chinese-Americans (n = 2117, participation rate = 52%), Korean-Americans (n = 2545, participation rate = 48%), and Vietnamese-Americans (n = 2179, participation rate = 63.5%). Measures. Sociodemographics including insurance status, smoking frequency, provider visit in past year, and provider advice to quit. Analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models examined dependent outcomes of (1) provider visit in past year and (2) provider advice to quit. Results. Less than a third (30.5%) of smokers in our study reported both seeing a provider (50.8%) and then receiving advice to quit (60.1%). Factors associated with provider visits included being female, being 45 years or older, having health insurance, and being Vietnamese. Among smokers who saw a provider, factors associated with provider advice to quit included having health insurance and being a daily smoker. Conclusions. Asian-American smokers reported low proportions of provider advice to quit in the past year, largely because only half of smokers saw a provider. Providers who see such smokers may need greater awareness that several effective cessation treatments do not require health insurance, and that intermittent smokers need advice to quit.

AB - Purpose. To determine proportions of provider advice to quit smoking for Asian-American smokers and to describe factors that may affect the provision of such advice. Design. Secondary data analysis of population-based survey. Setting. California. Subjects. Current smokers from the California Tobacco Use Surveys for Chinese-Americans (n = 2117, participation rate = 52%), Korean-Americans (n = 2545, participation rate = 48%), and Vietnamese-Americans (n = 2179, participation rate = 63.5%). Measures. Sociodemographics including insurance status, smoking frequency, provider visit in past year, and provider advice to quit. Analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models examined dependent outcomes of (1) provider visit in past year and (2) provider advice to quit. Results. Less than a third (30.5%) of smokers in our study reported both seeing a provider (50.8%) and then receiving advice to quit (60.1%). Factors associated with provider visits included being female, being 45 years or older, having health insurance, and being Vietnamese. Among smokers who saw a provider, factors associated with provider advice to quit included having health insurance and being a daily smoker. Conclusions. Asian-American smokers reported low proportions of provider advice to quit in the past year, largely because only half of smokers saw a provider. Providers who see such smokers may need greater awareness that several effective cessation treatments do not require health insurance, and that intermittent smokers need advice to quit.

KW - Asian

KW - Cessation

KW - Chinese

KW - Korean

KW - Prevention research

KW - Tobacco

KW - Vietnamese

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960941226&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960941226&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4278/ajhp.100611-QUAN-186

DO - 10.4278/ajhp.100611-QUAN-186

M3 - Article

C2 - 21510790

AN - SCOPUS:79960941226

VL - 25

JO - American Journal of Health Promotion

JF - American Journal of Health Promotion

SN - 0890-1171

IS - SUPPL.5

ER -