Proteolytic signals in the primary structure of annexins

J. A. Barnes, Aldrin V Gomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Annexins are a superfamily of calcium-dependent membrane-associated proteins which interact with phospholipids. The primary structure of Annexins I, III, VII, VIII and XI contain a region enriched in proline, glutamate, serine and threonine (PEST sequences) towards the N-terminal end while annexins II, V and VI possess PEST regions somewhat distal to the N-terminus. These PEST sequences are believed to be the signals for rapid intracellular degradation. Annexin I is known to be cleaved by calpain near its PEST region suggesting that its PEST region might be a possible calpain recognition site. Western blot analysis of annexins V and XI in rat lung homogenates suggest that these proteins are resistant to proteolysis by calpain. Annexin V was found to be stable to intrinsic lung proteases in the presence of either Ca2+ or EGTA while annexin XI was found to be partially degraded by intrinsic lung proteases in the presence of EGTA. Eight of the 10 known mammalian annexins also contain a pentapeptide sequence that is biochemically related to the KFERQ motif which is a known signal that targets protein for lysosomal proteolysis. Our data suggest that the annexins may be regulated by limited proteolysis, most likely at their N-terminal end, while most, if not all, of them might be degraded by the lysosomal pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume231
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Annexins
Proteolysis
Calpain
Annexin A5
Annexin A1
Egtazic Acid
Lung
Annexin A3
Annexin A6
Peptide Hydrolases
Annexin A2
Threonine
Proline
Serine
Rats
Glutamic Acid
Phospholipids
Membrane Proteins
Western Blotting
Calcium

Keywords

  • Annexin
  • Calpain
  • PEST regions
  • Proteolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Proteolytic signals in the primary structure of annexins. / Barnes, J. A.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 231, No. 1-2, 2002, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barnes, J. A. ; Gomes, Aldrin V. / Proteolytic signals in the primary structure of annexins. In: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 231, No. 1-2. pp. 1-7.
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