Protective effect of apolipoprotein E2 on coronary artery disease in African Americans is mediated through lipoprotein cholesterol

Anuurad Erdembileg, Jill Rubin, Guijing Lu, Thomas A. Pearson, Steve Holleran, Rajasekhar Ramakrishnan, Lars Berglund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the relationship of apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoforms and coronary artery disease (CAD) in 224 African Americans and 326 Caucasians undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography. The presence of CAD was defined as >50% stenosis in at least one artery. ApoE allele frequencies were 0.12, 0.62, and 0.26 for ε2, ε3, and ε4, respectively, in African Americans and 0.08, 0.78, and 0.14 for ε2, ε3, and ε4, respectively, in Caucasians. Among African Americans, CAD was present in 9 of 34 ε2 carriers (26%), significantly smaller (P < 0.05) in proportion compared with 39 of 82 ε3 carriers and 43 of 92 ε4 carriers (48% and 47%, respectively), suggesting a protective effect of the ε2 allele. No such difference was seen in Caucasians. In African Americans but not Caucasians, LDL cholesterol was lower in ε2 carriers than in ε3 and ε4 carriers (106 vs. 127 and 134 mg/dl, respectively; P < 0.005). After adjusting for lipid levels, the association between apoE2 and CAD was no longer significant. Thus, the protective effect of apoE2 seen in African Americans could be explained by a favorable lipid profile in ε2 carriers, whereas in Caucasians, the absence of such a protective effect could be attributable to the lack of effect of apoE2 on the lipid profile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2475-2481
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume47
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular risk factors
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Genetics
  • Polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

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