Protection of dentate hilar cells from prolonged stimulation by intracellular calcium chelation

Helen E. Scharfman, Philip A Schwartzkroin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

226 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged afferent stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus in vivo leads to degeneration only of those cells that lack immunoreactivity for the calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin. In order to test the hypothesis that calcium binding proteins protect against the effects of prolonged stimulation, intracellular recordings were made in hippocampal slices from cells that lack immunoreactivity for calcium binding proteins. Calcium binding protein-negative cells showed electrophysiological signs of deterioration during prolonged stimulation; cells containing calcium binding protein did not. When neurons without calcium binding proteins were impaled with microelectrodes containing the calcium chelator BAPTA, and BAPTA was allowed to diffuse into the cells, these cells showed no deterioration. These results indicate that, in a complex tissue of the central nervous system, an activity-induced increase in intracellular calcium can trigger processes leading to cell deterioration, and that increasing the calcium binding capacity of a cell decreases its vulnerability to damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-260
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume246
Issue number4927
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcium-Binding Proteins
Calcium
Calbindins
Parvalbumins
Dentate Gyrus
Microelectrodes
Central Nervous System
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Protection of dentate hilar cells from prolonged stimulation by intracellular calcium chelation. / Scharfman, Helen E.; Schwartzkroin, Philip A.

In: Science, Vol. 246, No. 4927, 1989, p. 257-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7c128eab1f2e4d81b1aa1d0c71bab1c4,
title = "Protection of dentate hilar cells from prolonged stimulation by intracellular calcium chelation",
abstract = "Prolonged afferent stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus in vivo leads to degeneration only of those cells that lack immunoreactivity for the calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin. In order to test the hypothesis that calcium binding proteins protect against the effects of prolonged stimulation, intracellular recordings were made in hippocampal slices from cells that lack immunoreactivity for calcium binding proteins. Calcium binding protein-negative cells showed electrophysiological signs of deterioration during prolonged stimulation; cells containing calcium binding protein did not. When neurons without calcium binding proteins were impaled with microelectrodes containing the calcium chelator BAPTA, and BAPTA was allowed to diffuse into the cells, these cells showed no deterioration. These results indicate that, in a complex tissue of the central nervous system, an activity-induced increase in intracellular calcium can trigger processes leading to cell deterioration, and that increasing the calcium binding capacity of a cell decreases its vulnerability to damage.",
author = "Scharfman, {Helen E.} and Schwartzkroin, {Philip A}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "246",
pages = "257--260",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "4927",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protection of dentate hilar cells from prolonged stimulation by intracellular calcium chelation

AU - Scharfman, Helen E.

AU - Schwartzkroin, Philip A

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - Prolonged afferent stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus in vivo leads to degeneration only of those cells that lack immunoreactivity for the calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin. In order to test the hypothesis that calcium binding proteins protect against the effects of prolonged stimulation, intracellular recordings were made in hippocampal slices from cells that lack immunoreactivity for calcium binding proteins. Calcium binding protein-negative cells showed electrophysiological signs of deterioration during prolonged stimulation; cells containing calcium binding protein did not. When neurons without calcium binding proteins were impaled with microelectrodes containing the calcium chelator BAPTA, and BAPTA was allowed to diffuse into the cells, these cells showed no deterioration. These results indicate that, in a complex tissue of the central nervous system, an activity-induced increase in intracellular calcium can trigger processes leading to cell deterioration, and that increasing the calcium binding capacity of a cell decreases its vulnerability to damage.

AB - Prolonged afferent stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus in vivo leads to degeneration only of those cells that lack immunoreactivity for the calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin. In order to test the hypothesis that calcium binding proteins protect against the effects of prolonged stimulation, intracellular recordings were made in hippocampal slices from cells that lack immunoreactivity for calcium binding proteins. Calcium binding protein-negative cells showed electrophysiological signs of deterioration during prolonged stimulation; cells containing calcium binding protein did not. When neurons without calcium binding proteins were impaled with microelectrodes containing the calcium chelator BAPTA, and BAPTA was allowed to diffuse into the cells, these cells showed no deterioration. These results indicate that, in a complex tissue of the central nervous system, an activity-induced increase in intracellular calcium can trigger processes leading to cell deterioration, and that increasing the calcium binding capacity of a cell decreases its vulnerability to damage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024313686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024313686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2508225

AN - SCOPUS:0024313686

VL - 246

SP - 257

EP - 260

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 4927

ER -