Prostate cancer and sexual consequences among men who have sex with men

Patrick J. Martin-Tuite, Alan W. Shindel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Prostate cancer and its treatment frequently lead to sexual side effects that negatively impact personal identity, sexual function, and intimate relationships. The sexual consequences of prostate cancer treatment on men who have sex with men (MSM) differ in some ways from what is observed in heterosexual men. This review summarizes literature from the past two decades exploring how MSM are affected by, and adapt to, prostate cancer treatment. The evidence on whether prostate cancer has a lower prevalence in MSM is unclear but lower screening rates are well-documented within this population. Prostate cancer treatment affects urinary, bowel, and sexual function in both MSM and heterosexual men. These changes may have different sexual and psychological ramifications in MSM when compared to heterosexual men. A common concern among MSM treated for prostate cancer is absence of support, both from the medical profession and in some cases from their own communities. Many MSM with prostate cancer have developed coping strategies and altered sexual practices to accommodate side effects. Lessons learned from this population may have relevance to sexual wellness in non-MSM prostate cancer survivors. Concise recommendations for caring for MSM with prostate cancer are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Impotence Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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