Prospects for radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in metastatic disease

A. Raventos, Sally J. DeNardo, Gerald L Denardo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Many monoclonal antibodies are now available that bind to human cancer cells with varying degrees of specificity. These antibodies can be labeled with various radionuclides, permitting tumor sites in the body to be imaged with scintillation cameras. SPECT, the emission counterpart of x-ray computed tomography, provides both qualitative and quantitative information in three dimensions about antibody distribution. We have detected a metastasis as small as 5 mm in a patient, and the theoretical limit of detection size is less than 1 mm. Tumors that are imaged with radiolabeled antibodies can be effectively treated with the same substance (radioimmunotherapy).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic Imaging
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1987

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Monoclonal Antibodies
Antibodies
Radioimmunotherapy
Neoplasms
Gamma Cameras
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Radioisotopes
Limit of Detection
Tomography
X-Rays
Neoplasm Metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Prospects for radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in metastatic disease. / Raventos, A.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Denardo, Gerald L.

In: Journal of Thoracic Imaging, Vol. 2, No. 4, 1987, p. 44-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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