Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: Role of parents' and older siblings' smoking

Jonathan B. Bricker, Arthur V. Peterson, Brian G. Leroux, M. Robyn Andersen, Kumar Rajan, Irwin G. Sarason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions. Design: Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking. Setting: Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP). Participants and measurements: Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available. Findings: The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32% (95% CI: 27%, 36%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15% (95% CI: 10%, 19%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28% (95% CI: 21%, 34%). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29% (95% CI: 17%, 39%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0% (95% CI: 0%, 8%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20% (95% CI: 4%, 33%). Conclusions: In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-136
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Adolescent smoking
  • Parents
  • Siblings
  • Smoking transitions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions : Role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. / Bricker, Jonathan B.; Peterson, Arthur V.; Leroux, Brian G.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Rajan, Kumar; Sarason, Irwin G.

In: Addiction, Vol. 101, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 128-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bricker, Jonathan B. ; Peterson, Arthur V. ; Leroux, Brian G. ; Andersen, M. Robyn ; Rajan, Kumar ; Sarason, Irwin G. / Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions : Role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. In: Addiction. 2006 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 128-136.
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abstract = "Aims: To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions. Design: Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking. Setting: Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP). Participants and measurements: Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available. Findings: The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32{\%} (95{\%} CI: 27{\%}, 36{\%}); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15{\%} (95{\%} CI: 10{\%}, 19{\%}); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28{\%} (95{\%} CI: 21{\%}, 34{\%}). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29{\%} (95{\%} CI: 17{\%}, 39{\%}); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0{\%} (95{\%} CI: 0{\%}, 8{\%}); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20{\%} (95{\%} CI: 4{\%}, 33{\%}). Conclusions: In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions.",
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AB - Aims: To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions. Design: Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking. Setting: Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP). Participants and measurements: Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available. Findings: The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32% (95% CI: 27%, 36%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15% (95% CI: 10%, 19%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28% (95% CI: 21%, 34%). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29% (95% CI: 17%, 39%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0% (95% CI: 0%, 8%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20% (95% CI: 4%, 33%). Conclusions: In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions.

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