Prospective evaluation of arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patellar tendon versus semitendinosus and gracilis tendons

Richard A Marder, J. R. Raskind, M. Carroll

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410 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eighty consecutive patients with chronic laxity due to a torn ACL underwent arthroscopically assisted reconstruction with either autogenous patellar tendon or doubled semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. Reconstructions were performed on a one-to-one alternating basis. Preoperatively, no significant differences between the two groups were noted with respect to age, sex, level of activity, and degree of laxity (chi square analysis). A standard rehabilitation regimen was used for all patients after surgery including immediate passive knee extension, early stationary cycling, protected weightbearing for 6 weeks, avoidance of resisted terminal knee extension until 6 months, and return to activity at 10 to 12 months postoperatively. Seventy-two patients were evaluated at a minimum of 24 months postoperatively (range, 24 to 40 months). No significant differences were noted between groups with respect to subjective complaints, functional level, or objective laxity evaluation, including KT-1000 measurements. Seventeen of 72 patients (24%) experienced anterior knee pain after ACL reconstruction. Overall, 46 of 72 patients (64%) returned to their preinjury level of activity. Mean KT-1000 scores were 1.6 ± 1.4 mm for the patellar tendon group and 1.9 ± 1.3 mm for the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons group. This study did find a statistically significant weakness in peak hamstrings torque at 60 deg/sec when reconstruction was performed with double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-484
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume19
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1991

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Patellar Ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Knee
Weight-Bearing
Torque
Rehabilitation
Hamstring Tendons
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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abstract = "Eighty consecutive patients with chronic laxity due to a torn ACL underwent arthroscopically assisted reconstruction with either autogenous patellar tendon or doubled semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. Reconstructions were performed on a one-to-one alternating basis. Preoperatively, no significant differences between the two groups were noted with respect to age, sex, level of activity, and degree of laxity (chi square analysis). A standard rehabilitation regimen was used for all patients after surgery including immediate passive knee extension, early stationary cycling, protected weightbearing for 6 weeks, avoidance of resisted terminal knee extension until 6 months, and return to activity at 10 to 12 months postoperatively. Seventy-two patients were evaluated at a minimum of 24 months postoperatively (range, 24 to 40 months). No significant differences were noted between groups with respect to subjective complaints, functional level, or objective laxity evaluation, including KT-1000 measurements. Seventeen of 72 patients (24{\%}) experienced anterior knee pain after ACL reconstruction. Overall, 46 of 72 patients (64{\%}) returned to their preinjury level of activity. Mean KT-1000 scores were 1.6 ± 1.4 mm for the patellar tendon group and 1.9 ± 1.3 mm for the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons group. This study did find a statistically significant weakness in peak hamstrings torque at 60 deg/sec when reconstruction was performed with double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons.",
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