Proprioceptive Sonomyographic Control: A novel method for intuitive and proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom for individuals with upper extremity limb loss

Ananya S. Dhawan, Biswarup Mukherjee, Shriniwas Patwardhan, Nima Akhlaghi, Guoqing Diao, Gyorgy Levay, Rahsaan Holley, Wilsaan M. Joiner, Michelle Harris-Love, Siddhartha Sikdar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Technological advances in multi-articulated prosthetic hands have outpaced the development of methods to intuitively control these devices. In fact, prosthetic users often cite "difficulty of use" as a key contributing factor for abandoning their prostheses. To overcome the limitations of the currently pervasive myoelectric control strategies, namely unintuitive proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom, we propose a novel approach: proprioceptive sonomyographiccontrol. Unlike myoelectric control strategies which measure electrical activation of muscles and use the extracted signals to determine the velocity of an end-effector; our sonomyography-based strategy measures mechanical muscle deformation directly with ultrasound and uses the extracted signals to proportionally control the position of an end-effector. Therefore, our sonomyography-based control is congruent with a prosthetic user’s innate proprioception of muscle deformation in the residual limb. In this work, we evaluated proprioceptive sonomyographic control with 5 prosthetic users and 5 able-bodied participants in a virtual target achievement and holding task for 5 different hand motions. We observed that with limited training, the performance of prosthetic users was comparable to that of able-bodied participants and thus conclude that proprioceptive sonomyographic control is a robust and intuitive prosthetic control strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9499
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Extremities
Hand
Proprioception
Muscles
Prostheses and Implants
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Proprioceptive Sonomyographic Control : A novel method for intuitive and proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom for individuals with upper extremity limb loss. / Dhawan, Ananya S.; Mukherjee, Biswarup; Patwardhan, Shriniwas; Akhlaghi, Nima; Diao, Guoqing; Levay, Gyorgy; Holley, Rahsaan; Joiner, Wilsaan M.; Harris-Love, Michelle; Sikdar, Siddhartha.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 9499, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dhawan, Ananya S. ; Mukherjee, Biswarup ; Patwardhan, Shriniwas ; Akhlaghi, Nima ; Diao, Guoqing ; Levay, Gyorgy ; Holley, Rahsaan ; Joiner, Wilsaan M. ; Harris-Love, Michelle ; Sikdar, Siddhartha. / Proprioceptive Sonomyographic Control : A novel method for intuitive and proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom for individuals with upper extremity limb loss. In: Scientific reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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