Propofol directly depresses lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation in goats

J. F. Antognini, Wei Wang Xiao Wei Wang, M. Piercy, Earl Carstens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that propofol, acting in the brain, would either enhance, or have no effect, on lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to a noxious mechanical stimulus applied to the hindlimb. We recorded the response of lumbar dorsal horn neurons during differential delivery of propofol to the brain and torso of goats. Methods: Goats were anesthetized with isoflurane and neck dissections performed which permitted cranial bypass. A laminectomy was made to allow microelectrode recording of lumbar dorsal horn neuronal activity. Isoflurane was maintained at 0.8 ± 0.1% to both head and torso throughout the study. During cranial bypass propofol was separately administered to the torso (1 mg.kg-1, n=7; 3.75 mg.kg-1, n=8) or cranial (0.04 mg.kg-1, n=7; 0.14 mg.kg-1, n=8) circulations. Results: Propofol administered to the torso depressed dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation: low dose: 500 ± 243 to 174 ± 240 impulses.min-1 at one minute post-injection, P < 0.001; high dose: 478 ± 204 to 91 ± 138 impulses.min-1 at one minute post-injection, P < 0.05). Propofol administered to the cranial circulation had no effect: low dose: 315 ± 150 to 410 ± 272 impulses.min-1, P > 0.05; high dose: 462 ± 261 to 371 ± 196 impulses.min-1, P > 0.05. Conclusions: These data indicate that propofol has a direct depressant effect on dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation, with little or no indirect supraspinal effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-279
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Journal of Anesthesia
Volume47
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

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Propofol
Torso
Goats
Isoflurane
Posterior Horn Cells
Neck Dissection
Laminectomy
Brain
Microelectrodes
Hindlimb
Head
Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Antognini, J. F., Xiao Wei Wang, W. W., Piercy, M., & Carstens, E. (2000). Propofol directly depresses lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation in goats. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, 47(3), 273-279.

Propofol directly depresses lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation in goats. / Antognini, J. F.; Xiao Wei Wang, Wei Wang; Piercy, M.; Carstens, Earl.

In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, Vol. 47, No. 3, 2000, p. 273-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Antognini, JF, Xiao Wei Wang, WW, Piercy, M & Carstens, E 2000, 'Propofol directly depresses lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation in goats', Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 273-279.
Antognini, J. F. ; Xiao Wei Wang, Wei Wang ; Piercy, M. ; Carstens, Earl. / Propofol directly depresses lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation in goats. In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia. 2000 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 273-279.
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abstract = "Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that propofol, acting in the brain, would either enhance, or have no effect, on lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to a noxious mechanical stimulus applied to the hindlimb. We recorded the response of lumbar dorsal horn neurons during differential delivery of propofol to the brain and torso of goats. Methods: Goats were anesthetized with isoflurane and neck dissections performed which permitted cranial bypass. A laminectomy was made to allow microelectrode recording of lumbar dorsal horn neuronal activity. Isoflurane was maintained at 0.8 ± 0.1{\%} to both head and torso throughout the study. During cranial bypass propofol was separately administered to the torso (1 mg.kg-1, n=7; 3.75 mg.kg-1, n=8) or cranial (0.04 mg.kg-1, n=7; 0.14 mg.kg-1, n=8) circulations. Results: Propofol administered to the torso depressed dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation: low dose: 500 ± 243 to 174 ± 240 impulses.min-1 at one minute post-injection, P < 0.001; high dose: 478 ± 204 to 91 ± 138 impulses.min-1 at one minute post-injection, P < 0.05). Propofol administered to the cranial circulation had no effect: low dose: 315 ± 150 to 410 ± 272 impulses.min-1, P > 0.05; high dose: 462 ± 261 to 371 ± 196 impulses.min-1, P > 0.05. Conclusions: These data indicate that propofol has a direct depressant effect on dorsal horn neuronal responses to noxious stimulation, with little or no indirect supraspinal effect.",
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