Project TENDR: Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Child Neurology Society, Endocrine Society, International Neurotoxicology Association, International Society for Children's Health and the Environment, International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians, National Hispanic Medical Association, National Medical Association

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children in America today are at an unacceptably high risk of developing neurodevelopmental disorders that affect the brain and nervous system including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disabilities, and other learning and behavioral disabilities. These are complex disorders with multiple causes—genetic, social, and environmental. The contribution of toxic chemicals to these disorders can be prevented. Approach: Leading scientific and medical experts, along with children’s health advocates, came together in 2015 under the auspices of Project TENDR: Targeting Environmental Neuro-Developmental Risks to issue a call to action to reduce widespread exposures to chemicals that interfere with fetal and children’s brain development. Based on the available scientific evidence, the TENDR authors have identified prime examples of toxic chemicals and pollutants that increase children’s risks for neurodevelopmental disorders. These include chemicals that are used extensively in consumer products and that have become widespread in the environment. Some are chemicals to which children and pregnant women are regularly exposed, and they are detected in the bodies of virtually all Americans in national surveys conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The vast majority of chemicals in industrial and consumer products undergo almost no testing for developmental neurotoxicity or other health effects. Conclusion: Based on these findings, we assert that the current system in the United States for evaluating scientific evidence and making health-based decisions about environmental chemicals is fundamentally broken. To help reduce the unacceptably high prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders in our children, we must eliminate or significantly reduce exposures to chemicals that contribute to these conditions. We must adopt a new framework for assessing chemicals that have the potential to disrupt brain development and prevent the use of those that may pose a risk. This consensus statement lays the foundation for developing recommendations to monitor, assess, and reduce exposures to neurotoxic chemicals. These measures are urgently needed if we are to protect healthy brain development so that current and future generations can reach their fullest potential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)A118-A122
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume124
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Consensus
Poisons
Brain
Learning Disorders
Social Responsibility
Health
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Autistic Disorder
Intellectual Disability
Nervous System
Pregnant Women
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Child Neurology Society, Endocrine Society, International Neurotoxicology Association, International Society for Children's Health and the Environment, International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, ... National Medical Association (2016). Project TENDR: Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement. Environmental Health Perspectives, 124(7), A118-A122. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP358

Project TENDR : Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement. / American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG); Child Neurology Society; Endocrine Society; International Neurotoxicology Association; International Society for Children's Health and the Environment; International Society for Environmental Epidemiology; National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians; National Hispanic Medical Association; National Medical Association.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 124, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. A118-A122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Child Neurology Society, Endocrine Society, International Neurotoxicology Association, International Society for Children's Health and the Environment, International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians, National Hispanic Medical Association & National Medical Association 2016, 'Project TENDR: Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 124, no. 7, pp. A118-A122. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP358
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Child Neurology Society, Endocrine Society, International Neurotoxicology Association, International Society for Children's Health and the Environment, International Society for Environmental Epidemiology et al. Project TENDR: Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2016 Jul 1;124(7):A118-A122. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP358
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) ; Child Neurology Society ; Endocrine Society ; International Neurotoxicology Association ; International Society for Children's Health and the Environment ; International Society for Environmental Epidemiology ; National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians ; National Hispanic Medical Association ; National Medical Association. / Project TENDR : Targeting environmental neuro-developmental risks. the TENDR consensus statement. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2016 ; Vol. 124, No. 7. pp. A118-A122.
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AU - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

AU - Child Neurology Society

AU - Endocrine Society

AU - International Neurotoxicology Association

AU - International Society for Children's Health and the Environment

AU - International Society for Environmental Epidemiology

AU - National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians

AU - National Hispanic Medical Association

AU - National Medical Association

AU - Bennett, Deborah H

AU - Bellinger, D. C.

AU - Birnbaum, L. S.

AU - Bradman, A.

AU - Chen, A.

AU - Cory-Slechta, D. A.

AU - Engel, S. M.

AU - Fallin, M. D.

AU - Halladay, A.

AU - Hauser, R.

AU - Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

AU - Kwiatkowski, C. F.

AU - Lanphear, B. P.

AU - Marquez, E.

AU - Marty, M.

AU - McPartland, J.

AU - Newschaffer, C. J.

AU - Payne-Sturges, D.

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AU - Perera, F. P.

AU - Ritz, B.

AU - Sass, J.

AU - Schantz, S. L.

AU - Webster, T. F.

AU - Whyatt, R. M.

AU - Woodruff, T. J.

AU - Zoeller, R. T.

AU - Anderko, L.

AU - Campbell, C.

AU - Conry, J. A.

AU - DeNicola, N.

AU - Gould, R. M.

AU - Hirtz, D.

AU - Huffling, K.

AU - Landrigan, P. J.

AU - Lavin, A.

AU - Miller, M.

AU - Mitchell, M. A.

AU - Rubin, L.

AU - Schettler, T.

AU - Tran, H. L.

AU - Acosta, A.

AU - Brody, C.

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AU - Miller, P.

AU - Swanson, M.

AU - Witherspoon, N. O.

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