Profiling with structural elucidation of the neutral and anionic O-linked oligosaccharides in the egg jelly coat of Xenopus laevis by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

Ken Tseng, Yongming Xie, Juliette Seeley, Jerry L. Hedrick, Carlito B Lebrilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

A strategic method with high speed and sensitivity is outlined for the analysis of mucin-type oligosaccharide from the jelly coat of Xenopus laevis. The method relies primarily on mass spectrometric techniques, in this case matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). Separation with isolation of the oligosaccharides was streamlined to couple well with mass spectrometry allowing the rapid determination of all detectable components from both neutral and anionic species. Partial structures of anionic components, composed primarily of sulfate esters, were obtained with CID. For neutral species, a method that allowed the complete structural determination using mass spectrometry was used. The method builds on the structure of small number of known compounds to determine unknown structures from the same biological source. In this example, a small number of oligosaccharides, elucidated previously by NMR, were used to develop a set of substructural motifs that were characterized by CID. The presence of the motifs in the CID spectra were then used to determine the structures of unknown compounds that were in abundances too small for NMR analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-320
Number of pages12
JournalGlycoconjugate Journal
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Catalog-library approach
  • Collision-induced dissociation
  • Fourier transform mass spectrometry
  • MALDI
  • Xenopus laevis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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