Probiotic Administration in Infants with Gastroschisis

A Pilot Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

Weston T. Powell, Robyn A. Borghese, Karen M. Kalanetra, Majid Mirmiran, David A. Mills, Mark Underwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:: Infants with gastroschisis often require long periods of gastric suctioning and hospitalization. The impact of these interventions on the intestinal microbiota and attempts to alter the microbial community have not been studied. We sought to determine how the intestinal microbiota is influenced by current treatment of gastroschisis and whether alteration of the intestinal microbiota with a probiotic microbe will influence length of hospitalization. METHODS:: We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of administration of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis in 24 infants with gastroschisis. The primary outcome was changes in the fecal microbiota and the secondary outcome was length of hospital stay. RESULTS:: Administration of the probiotic or placebo was well tolerated, even during the period of gastric suctioning. The overall microbial communities were not significantly different between groups, though analysis of the final specimens by family demonstrated higher Bifidobacteriaceae, lower Clostridiaceae, and trends toward lower Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Streptococcaceae in the probiotic group. Clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS:: In this pilot study there was significant dysbiosis in infants with gastroschisis that was partially attenuated by administration of Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 3 2015

Fingerprint

Gastroschisis
Probiotics
Length of Stay
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Staphylococcaceae
Streptococcaceae
Enterococcaceae
Stomach
Hospitalization
Dysbiosis
Microbiota
Enterobacteriaceae
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Bifidobacterium longum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Probiotic Administration in Infants with Gastroschisis : A Pilot Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. / Powell, Weston T.; Borghese, Robyn A.; Kalanetra, Karen M.; Mirmiran, Majid; Mills, David A.; Underwood, Mark.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 03.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powell, Weston T. ; Borghese, Robyn A. ; Kalanetra, Karen M. ; Mirmiran, Majid ; Mills, David A. ; Underwood, Mark. / Probiotic Administration in Infants with Gastroschisis : A Pilot Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2015.
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N2 - OBJECTIVES:: Infants with gastroschisis often require long periods of gastric suctioning and hospitalization. The impact of these interventions on the intestinal microbiota and attempts to alter the microbial community have not been studied. We sought to determine how the intestinal microbiota is influenced by current treatment of gastroschisis and whether alteration of the intestinal microbiota with a probiotic microbe will influence length of hospitalization. METHODS:: We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of administration of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis in 24 infants with gastroschisis. The primary outcome was changes in the fecal microbiota and the secondary outcome was length of hospital stay. RESULTS:: Administration of the probiotic or placebo was well tolerated, even during the period of gastric suctioning. The overall microbial communities were not significantly different between groups, though analysis of the final specimens by family demonstrated higher Bifidobacteriaceae, lower Clostridiaceae, and trends toward lower Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Streptococcaceae in the probiotic group. Clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS:: In this pilot study there was significant dysbiosis in infants with gastroschisis that was partially attenuated by administration of Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis.

AB - OBJECTIVES:: Infants with gastroschisis often require long periods of gastric suctioning and hospitalization. The impact of these interventions on the intestinal microbiota and attempts to alter the microbial community have not been studied. We sought to determine how the intestinal microbiota is influenced by current treatment of gastroschisis and whether alteration of the intestinal microbiota with a probiotic microbe will influence length of hospitalization. METHODS:: We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of administration of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis in 24 infants with gastroschisis. The primary outcome was changes in the fecal microbiota and the secondary outcome was length of hospital stay. RESULTS:: Administration of the probiotic or placebo was well tolerated, even during the period of gastric suctioning. The overall microbial communities were not significantly different between groups, though analysis of the final specimens by family demonstrated higher Bifidobacteriaceae, lower Clostridiaceae, and trends toward lower Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Streptococcaceae in the probiotic group. Clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS:: In this pilot study there was significant dysbiosis in infants with gastroschisis that was partially attenuated by administration of Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis.

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