Primary stage of feline immunodeficiency virus infection

Viral dissemination and cellular targets

A. M. Beebe, N. Dua, T. G. Faith, Peter F Moore, Niels C Pedersen, Satya Dandekar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify cellular and organ targets of acute feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in vivo. Tissues of FIV- infected cats were studied at eight time points during the first 3 months after experimental infection. FIV nucleic acids were first detected by in situ hybridization 21 days after infection, approximately 1.5 weeks after lymph node enlargement was first observed and 3 weeks before the primary acute flu-like illness. The majority of FIV-infected cells were present in lymphoid organs, though low numbers of infected cells were noted in nonlymphoid organs as well. Germinal centers harbored many of the FIV- infected cells within lymphoid tissues. The thymic cortex was also a major site of early infection. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that T lymphocytes were the primary target of early FIV infection in tissues of cats before the onset of clinical signs of acute illness. An unidentified population of mononuclear cells and a few macrophages were also infected. During the ensuing acute flu-like illness, the proportion of FIV-infected macrophages in tissues increased dramatically. This early shift in the predominant cellular localization of FIV from T lymphocytes to macrophages may be important for establishing viral persistence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3080-3091
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume68
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
Feline immunodeficiency virus
Virus Diseases
infection
macrophages
Macrophages
influenza
in situ hybridization
In Situ Hybridization
Cats
T-lymphocytes
Infection
cells
cats
T-Lymphocytes
Germinal Center
Lymphoid Tissue
Nucleic Acids
nucleic acids
immunohistochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Primary stage of feline immunodeficiency virus infection : Viral dissemination and cellular targets. / Beebe, A. M.; Dua, N.; Faith, T. G.; Moore, Peter F; Pedersen, Niels C; Dandekar, Satya.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 68, No. 5, 1994, p. 3080-3091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a85782792a3b4f09b387d6606251e660,
title = "Primary stage of feline immunodeficiency virus infection: Viral dissemination and cellular targets",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to identify cellular and organ targets of acute feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in vivo. Tissues of FIV- infected cats were studied at eight time points during the first 3 months after experimental infection. FIV nucleic acids were first detected by in situ hybridization 21 days after infection, approximately 1.5 weeks after lymph node enlargement was first observed and 3 weeks before the primary acute flu-like illness. The majority of FIV-infected cells were present in lymphoid organs, though low numbers of infected cells were noted in nonlymphoid organs as well. Germinal centers harbored many of the FIV- infected cells within lymphoid tissues. The thymic cortex was also a major site of early infection. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that T lymphocytes were the primary target of early FIV infection in tissues of cats before the onset of clinical signs of acute illness. An unidentified population of mononuclear cells and a few macrophages were also infected. During the ensuing acute flu-like illness, the proportion of FIV-infected macrophages in tissues increased dramatically. This early shift in the predominant cellular localization of FIV from T lymphocytes to macrophages may be important for establishing viral persistence.",
author = "Beebe, {A. M.} and N. Dua and Faith, {T. G.} and Moore, {Peter F} and Pedersen, {Niels C} and Satya Dandekar",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "3080--3091",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Primary stage of feline immunodeficiency virus infection

T2 - Viral dissemination and cellular targets

AU - Beebe, A. M.

AU - Dua, N.

AU - Faith, T. G.

AU - Moore, Peter F

AU - Pedersen, Niels C

AU - Dandekar, Satya

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - The objective of this study was to identify cellular and organ targets of acute feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in vivo. Tissues of FIV- infected cats were studied at eight time points during the first 3 months after experimental infection. FIV nucleic acids were first detected by in situ hybridization 21 days after infection, approximately 1.5 weeks after lymph node enlargement was first observed and 3 weeks before the primary acute flu-like illness. The majority of FIV-infected cells were present in lymphoid organs, though low numbers of infected cells were noted in nonlymphoid organs as well. Germinal centers harbored many of the FIV- infected cells within lymphoid tissues. The thymic cortex was also a major site of early infection. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that T lymphocytes were the primary target of early FIV infection in tissues of cats before the onset of clinical signs of acute illness. An unidentified population of mononuclear cells and a few macrophages were also infected. During the ensuing acute flu-like illness, the proportion of FIV-infected macrophages in tissues increased dramatically. This early shift in the predominant cellular localization of FIV from T lymphocytes to macrophages may be important for establishing viral persistence.

AB - The objective of this study was to identify cellular and organ targets of acute feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in vivo. Tissues of FIV- infected cats were studied at eight time points during the first 3 months after experimental infection. FIV nucleic acids were first detected by in situ hybridization 21 days after infection, approximately 1.5 weeks after lymph node enlargement was first observed and 3 weeks before the primary acute flu-like illness. The majority of FIV-infected cells were present in lymphoid organs, though low numbers of infected cells were noted in nonlymphoid organs as well. Germinal centers harbored many of the FIV- infected cells within lymphoid tissues. The thymic cortex was also a major site of early infection. Combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that T lymphocytes were the primary target of early FIV infection in tissues of cats before the onset of clinical signs of acute illness. An unidentified population of mononuclear cells and a few macrophages were also infected. During the ensuing acute flu-like illness, the proportion of FIV-infected macrophages in tissues increased dramatically. This early shift in the predominant cellular localization of FIV from T lymphocytes to macrophages may be important for establishing viral persistence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028298084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028298084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 3080

EP - 3091

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 5

ER -