Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain

Findings From 19 Countries

Maria Carmen Viana, Carmen C.W. Lim, Flavia Garcia Pereira, Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, Jordi Alonso, Ronny Bruffaerts, Peter de Jonge, Jose Miguel Caldas-de-Almeida, Siobhan O'Neill, Dan J. Stein, Ali Al-Hamzawi, Corina Benjet, Graça Cardoso, Silvia Florescu, Giovanni de Girolamo, Josep Maria Haro, Chiyi Hu, Viviane Kovess-Masfety, Daphna Levinson, Marina Piazza & 4 others José Posada-Villa, Daniel Rabczenko, Ronald C. Kessler, Kate M. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Associations between depression/anxiety and pain are well established, but its directionality is not clear. We examined the associations between temporally previous mental disorders and subsequent self-reported chronic back/neck pain onset, and investigated the variation in the strength of associations according to timing of events during the life course, and according to gender. Data were from population-based household surveys conducted in 19 countries (N = 52,095). Lifetime prevalence and age of onset of 16 mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and the occurrence and age of onset of back/neck pain were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Survival analyses estimated the associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent back/neck pain onset. All mental disorders were positively associated with back/neck pain in bivariate analyses; most (12 of 16) remained so after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Early-onset disorders were stronger predictors of pain; when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, this remained the case for depression/dysthymia. No gender differences were observed. In conclusion, individuals with mental disorder, beyond depression and anxiety, are at higher risk of developing subsequent back/neck pain, stressing the importance of early detection of mental disorders, and highlight the need of assessing back/neck pain in mental health clinical settings. Perspective: Previous mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition are positively associated with subsequent back/neck pain onset, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Earlier-onset mental disorders are stronger predictors of subsequent pain onset, compared with later-onset disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Neck Pain
Back Pain
Mental Disorders
Chronic Pain
Pain
Depression
Age of Onset
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Anxiety
Survival Analysis
Mental Health
Interviews

Keywords

  • Back or neck pain
  • Cross-national studies
  • Mental health
  • Mental-physical comorbidity
  • Psychiatric epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain : Findings From 19 Countries. / Viana, Maria Carmen; Lim, Carmen C.W.; Garcia Pereira, Flavia; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Jonge, Peter; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; O'Neill, Siobhan; Stein, Dan J.; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Benjet, Corina; Cardoso, Graça; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chiyi; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Levinson, Daphna; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Rabczenko, Daniel; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate M.

In: Journal of Pain, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Viana, MC, Lim, CCW, Garcia Pereira, F, Aguilar-Gaxiola, S, Alonso, J, Bruffaerts, R, de Jonge, P, Caldas-de-Almeida, JM, O'Neill, S, Stein, DJ, Al-Hamzawi, A, Benjet, C, Cardoso, G, Florescu, S, de Girolamo, G, Haro, JM, Hu, C, Kovess-Masfety, V, Levinson, D, Piazza, M, Posada-Villa, J, Rabczenko, D, Kessler, RC & Scott, KM 2017, 'Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain: Findings From 19 Countries', Journal of Pain. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2017.08.011
Viana, Maria Carmen ; Lim, Carmen C.W. ; Garcia Pereira, Flavia ; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio ; Alonso, Jordi ; Bruffaerts, Ronny ; de Jonge, Peter ; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel ; O'Neill, Siobhan ; Stein, Dan J. ; Al-Hamzawi, Ali ; Benjet, Corina ; Cardoso, Graça ; Florescu, Silvia ; de Girolamo, Giovanni ; Haro, Josep Maria ; Hu, Chiyi ; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane ; Levinson, Daphna ; Piazza, Marina ; Posada-Villa, José ; Rabczenko, Daniel ; Kessler, Ronald C. ; Scott, Kate M. / Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain : Findings From 19 Countries. In: Journal of Pain. 2017.
@article{a4e078f602df4711b549fc51a14acf0b,
title = "Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain: Findings From 19 Countries",
abstract = "Associations between depression/anxiety and pain are well established, but its directionality is not clear. We examined the associations between temporally previous mental disorders and subsequent self-reported chronic back/neck pain onset, and investigated the variation in the strength of associations according to timing of events during the life course, and according to gender. Data were from population-based household surveys conducted in 19 countries (N = 52,095). Lifetime prevalence and age of onset of 16 mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and the occurrence and age of onset of back/neck pain were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Survival analyses estimated the associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent back/neck pain onset. All mental disorders were positively associated with back/neck pain in bivariate analyses; most (12 of 16) remained so after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Early-onset disorders were stronger predictors of pain; when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, this remained the case for depression/dysthymia. No gender differences were observed. In conclusion, individuals with mental disorder, beyond depression and anxiety, are at higher risk of developing subsequent back/neck pain, stressing the importance of early detection of mental disorders, and highlight the need of assessing back/neck pain in mental health clinical settings. Perspective: Previous mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition are positively associated with subsequent back/neck pain onset, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Earlier-onset mental disorders are stronger predictors of subsequent pain onset, compared with later-onset disorders.",
keywords = "Back or neck pain, Cross-national studies, Mental health, Mental-physical comorbidity, Psychiatric epidemiology",
author = "Viana, {Maria Carmen} and Lim, {Carmen C.W.} and {Garcia Pereira}, Flavia and Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola and Jordi Alonso and Ronny Bruffaerts and {de Jonge}, Peter and Caldas-de-Almeida, {Jose Miguel} and Siobhan O'Neill and Stein, {Dan J.} and Ali Al-Hamzawi and Corina Benjet and Gra{\cc}a Cardoso and Silvia Florescu and {de Girolamo}, Giovanni and Haro, {Josep Maria} and Chiyi Hu and Viviane Kovess-Masfety and Daphna Levinson and Marina Piazza and Jos{\'e} Posada-Villa and Daniel Rabczenko and Kessler, {Ronald C.} and Scott, {Kate M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpain.2017.08.011",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Pain",
issn = "1526-5900",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Previous Mental Disorders and Subsequent Onset of Chronic Back or Neck Pain

T2 - Findings From 19 Countries

AU - Viana, Maria Carmen

AU - Lim, Carmen C.W.

AU - Garcia Pereira, Flavia

AU - Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

AU - Alonso, Jordi

AU - Bruffaerts, Ronny

AU - de Jonge, Peter

AU - Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel

AU - O'Neill, Siobhan

AU - Stein, Dan J.

AU - Al-Hamzawi, Ali

AU - Benjet, Corina

AU - Cardoso, Graça

AU - Florescu, Silvia

AU - de Girolamo, Giovanni

AU - Haro, Josep Maria

AU - Hu, Chiyi

AU - Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

AU - Levinson, Daphna

AU - Piazza, Marina

AU - Posada-Villa, José

AU - Rabczenko, Daniel

AU - Kessler, Ronald C.

AU - Scott, Kate M.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Associations between depression/anxiety and pain are well established, but its directionality is not clear. We examined the associations between temporally previous mental disorders and subsequent self-reported chronic back/neck pain onset, and investigated the variation in the strength of associations according to timing of events during the life course, and according to gender. Data were from population-based household surveys conducted in 19 countries (N = 52,095). Lifetime prevalence and age of onset of 16 mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and the occurrence and age of onset of back/neck pain were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Survival analyses estimated the associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent back/neck pain onset. All mental disorders were positively associated with back/neck pain in bivariate analyses; most (12 of 16) remained so after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Early-onset disorders were stronger predictors of pain; when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, this remained the case for depression/dysthymia. No gender differences were observed. In conclusion, individuals with mental disorder, beyond depression and anxiety, are at higher risk of developing subsequent back/neck pain, stressing the importance of early detection of mental disorders, and highlight the need of assessing back/neck pain in mental health clinical settings. Perspective: Previous mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition are positively associated with subsequent back/neck pain onset, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Earlier-onset mental disorders are stronger predictors of subsequent pain onset, compared with later-onset disorders.

AB - Associations between depression/anxiety and pain are well established, but its directionality is not clear. We examined the associations between temporally previous mental disorders and subsequent self-reported chronic back/neck pain onset, and investigated the variation in the strength of associations according to timing of events during the life course, and according to gender. Data were from population-based household surveys conducted in 19 countries (N = 52,095). Lifetime prevalence and age of onset of 16 mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and the occurrence and age of onset of back/neck pain were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Survival analyses estimated the associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent back/neck pain onset. All mental disorders were positively associated with back/neck pain in bivariate analyses; most (12 of 16) remained so after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Early-onset disorders were stronger predictors of pain; when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidity, this remained the case for depression/dysthymia. No gender differences were observed. In conclusion, individuals with mental disorder, beyond depression and anxiety, are at higher risk of developing subsequent back/neck pain, stressing the importance of early detection of mental disorders, and highlight the need of assessing back/neck pain in mental health clinical settings. Perspective: Previous mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition are positively associated with subsequent back/neck pain onset, with a clear dose-response relationship between number of mental disorders and subsequent pain. Earlier-onset mental disorders are stronger predictors of subsequent pain onset, compared with later-onset disorders.

KW - Back or neck pain

KW - Cross-national studies

KW - Mental health

KW - Mental-physical comorbidity

KW - Psychiatric epidemiology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034816815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034816815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpain.2017.08.011

DO - 10.1016/j.jpain.2017.08.011

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Pain

JF - Journal of Pain

SN - 1526-5900

ER -