Prevalence of shigellosis and other enteric pathogens in a zoologic collection of primates.

L. D. Banish, R. Sims, D. Sack, R. J. Montali, Lyndsay Phillips, M. Bush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An epidemiologic study of shigellosis was the preliminary step in the formulation of a plan for the control of devastating infectious diseases in nonhuman primates at the National Zoological Park. Data were collected from primate groups with enzootic shigellosis and included the following species: white-cheeked and siamong gibbons (Hylobates concolor and H syndactylies); lion-tailed, celebes, and Barbary macaques (Macaca silenus, M nigera, and M sylvanus); black and white colobus monkeys (Colobus guerzea); grey-cheeked mangabeys (Cerecocebus albigena); spider monkeys (Ateles susciceps robusuts); ruffed lemurs (Lemur varrigatus); lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla); and orangutans (pongo pygmaeus). Data included results of physical examination, proctoscopy with biopsy, fecal parasitologic and cytologic examinations, and bacteriologic culturing of swabbed specimens of rectum and gingiva. Repetitive fecal examinations were subsequently performed and included bacteriologic culturing of fecal specimens for enteropathogenic bacteria and parasites and cytologic examination of feces. Data were collected for a 1-year period from 82 primates, and 14 gibbons were studied intensively. White-cheeked and siamang gibbons shed Shigella flexneri sporadically, but persistently. All gibbons were affected with a mean point prevalence of 30.7% (range 0 to 71%). Shigella flexneri also was isolated from feces of lion-tailed macaques. Shigella sonnei was isolated from feces of grey-cheeked mangabeys, celebes macaques, and spider monkeys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-132
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume203
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

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shigellosis
Hylobates
Bacillary Dysentery
Hylobatidae
Primates
Atelinae
Macaca
Shigella flexneri
Cercocebus
monkeys
Colobus
Gorilla gorilla
Pongo pygmaeus
pathogens
feces
Lemur
Feces
Lions
proctoscopy
Indonesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Prevalence of shigellosis and other enteric pathogens in a zoologic collection of primates. / Banish, L. D.; Sims, R.; Sack, D.; Montali, R. J.; Phillips, Lyndsay; Bush, M.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 203, No. 1, 01.07.1993, p. 126-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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