Prevalence of renal and cervical vertebral anomalies in patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia

Shane Zim, Janet Lee, Brian Rubinstein, Craig W Senders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with isolated microtia or aural atresia have an increased prevalence of renal or cervical vertebral anomalies. Design: The study design was a retrospective medical record review. Setting: The setting was the following four distinct institutions: an urban tertiary care children's hospital, two urban academic medical centers, and a staff-model health maintenance organization. Participants: Patients diagnosed with microtia, aural atresia, or oculoauriculovertebral spectrum were identified. Patients with facial asymmetry, craniofacial microsomia, and other craniofacial abnormalities or syndromes were excluded. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures were the number of patients with isolated microtia or aural atresia who underwent a renal ultrasound or cervical spine X-ray, the results of those studies, and further evaluation or treatment for any abnormalities found. Statistical Analysis: A binomial analysis using a one-sided 95% confidence level was performed. Results: A total of 514 patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia were identified. Of these patients, 145 (28%) had undergone a renal ultrasound and 81 (16%) had undergone cervical spine X-rays. A total of 3 patients (2%) had minimal renal pelviectasis, all of which had resolved on repeat ultrasound and required no treatment. There were no structural renal abnormalities identified, and there were no cervical spine abnormalities identified. Conclusions: The data suggest that there is no increased prevalence of structural renal or cervical vertebral anomalies in patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia. Therefore, these patients do not require routine screening renal ultrasound or cervical spine X-rays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-667
Number of pages4
JournalCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ear
Kidney
Spine
Goldenhar Syndrome
X-Rays
Craniofacial Abnormalities
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Facial Asymmetry
Congenital Microtia
Health Maintenance Organizations
Urban Hospitals
Tertiary Healthcare
Medical Records
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aural atresia
  • Craniofacial microsomia
  • Hemifacial microsomia
  • Microtia
  • Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum
  • Renal anomalies
  • Vertebral anomalies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Prevalence of renal and cervical vertebral anomalies in patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia. / Zim, Shane; Lee, Janet; Rubinstein, Brian; Senders, Craig W.

In: Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 664-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with isolated microtia or aural atresia have an increased prevalence of renal or cervical vertebral anomalies. Design: The study design was a retrospective medical record review. Setting: The setting was the following four distinct institutions: an urban tertiary care children's hospital, two urban academic medical centers, and a staff-model health maintenance organization. Participants: Patients diagnosed with microtia, aural atresia, or oculoauriculovertebral spectrum were identified. Patients with facial asymmetry, craniofacial microsomia, and other craniofacial abnormalities or syndromes were excluded. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures were the number of patients with isolated microtia or aural atresia who underwent a renal ultrasound or cervical spine X-ray, the results of those studies, and further evaluation or treatment for any abnormalities found. Statistical Analysis: A binomial analysis using a one-sided 95{\%} confidence level was performed. Results: A total of 514 patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia were identified. Of these patients, 145 (28{\%}) had undergone a renal ultrasound and 81 (16{\%}) had undergone cervical spine X-rays. A total of 3 patients (2{\%}) had minimal renal pelviectasis, all of which had resolved on repeat ultrasound and required no treatment. There were no structural renal abnormalities identified, and there were no cervical spine abnormalities identified. Conclusions: The data suggest that there is no increased prevalence of structural renal or cervical vertebral anomalies in patients with isolated microtia and/or aural atresia. Therefore, these patients do not require routine screening renal ultrasound or cervical spine X-rays.",
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