Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice

P. Wiggins, Marc B Schenker, R. Green, S. Samuels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All female graduates of a major U.S. veterinary school were surveyed by mailed questionnaire to obtain details of work practice and hazard exposure during the most recent year worked and during all pregnancies. Exposure questions were based on previously implicated occupational hazards which included anesthetic gases, radiation, zoonoses, prostaglandins, vaccines, physical trauma, and pesticides. The response rate was 86% (462/537). We found that practice type and pregnancy status were major determinants of hazard exposure within the veterinary profession. Small-animal practitioners reported the highest rates of exposure to anesthetic gas (94%), X-ray (90%), and pesticides (57%). Large-animal practitioners reported greater rates of trauma (64%) and potential exposure to prostaglandins (92%), Brucella abortus vaccine (23%), and carbon monoxide (18%). Potentially hazardous workplace practices or equipment were common. Forty-one percent of respondents who reported taking X-rays did not wear film badges, and 76% reported physically restraining animals for X-ray procedures. Twenty-seven percent of the respondents exposed to anesthetic gases worked at facilities which did not have waste anesthetic gas scavenging systems. Women who worked as veterinarians during a pregnancy attempted to reduce exposures to X-rays, insecticides, and other potentially hazardous exposures. Some potentially hazardous workplace exposures are common in veterinary practice, and measures to educate workers and to reduce these exposures should not await demonstration of adverse health effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1989

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Inhalation Anesthetics
X-Rays
Pesticides
Workplace
Pregnancy
Prostaglandins
Brucella Vaccine
Veterinary Schools
Film Dosimetry
Brucella abortus
Veterinarians
Wounds and Injuries
Zoonoses
Carbon Monoxide
Insecticides
Vaccines
Radiation
Equipment and Supplies
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice. / Wiggins, P.; Schenker, Marc B; Green, R.; Samuels, S.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1989, p. 55-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiggins, P. ; Schenker, Marc B ; Green, R. ; Samuels, S. / Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice. In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 1989 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 55-66.
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