Prevalence of FMR1 repeat expansions in movement disorders

A systematic review

D. A. Hall, Randi J Hagerman, Paul J Hagerman, S. Jacquemont, M. A. Leehey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We reviewed prevalence rates of fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1) repeat expansions in movement disorder populations. Inclusion criteria included published epidemiological studies from systematic searches of Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane Databases and Web Science. Thirteen cross-sectional studies were carried out between 2003 and 2005. Subjects with ataxia showed higher than expected rates while those with essential tremor and parkinsonism showed lower rates. The heterogeneous design of the studies, inclusion criteria and mean age of subjects may have led to underestimation of FMR1 repeat expansion prevalence rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-155
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Movement Disorders
Essential Tremor
Parkinsonian Disorders
Ataxia
PubMed
Intellectual Disability
Epidemiologic Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases
Population
Genes

Keywords

  • Cerebellar ataxia
  • Fragile X syndrome
  • Fragile-X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
  • Parkinsonism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Prevalence of FMR1 repeat expansions in movement disorders : A systematic review. / Hall, D. A.; Hagerman, Randi J; Hagerman, Paul J; Jacquemont, S.; Leehey, M. A.

In: Neuroepidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 04.2006, p. 151-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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