Prevalence of feline Chlamydia psittaci and feline herpesvirus 1 in cats with upper respiratory tract disease.

Jane E Sykes, G. A. Anderson, V. P. Studdert, G. F. Browning

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Abstract

The epidemiology of feline chlamydiosis and feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV1) infection in cats was determined using a duplex polymerase chain reaction assay. In cats with upper respiratory tract disease (URTD), prevalences of 66 (14.3%) of 462 cats and 98 (21.2%) of 462 cats were found for Chlamydia psittaci and FHV1, respectively. In cats without URTD, prevalences were 1/87 (1.1%) for both pathogens. Younger cats, cats sampled in summer, and cats with conjunctivitis were more likely to be positive for C psittaci than were cats sampled in other seasons and cats without conjunctivitis. Cats with recent contact with cats outside the household, cats with acute disease, and sneezing cats were more likely to be positive for FHV1 than were cats that had not had recent contact with cats outside the household, cats with chronic disease, and cats that were not sneezing. Purebred cats were less likely to be positive for FHV1 than were mixed breed cats and prevalence varied with year of sampling. Coinfection with both pathogens was lower than would be expected from their respective prevalences. Vaccinated cats were equally likely to be positive for FHV1 as unvaccinated cats. In sneezing cats FHV1 was more likely to be detected than C psittaci, particularly in acute cases, and when sneezing was not accompanied by conjunctivitis. Cats with reproductive disease concurrent with URTD were more likely to be infected with FHV1 than with C psittaci. Thus, the factors that should be considered in clinical diagnoses of C psittaci infections are the presence of conjunctivitis, age, and season, whereas contact with other cats, acute disease, and sneezing should be considered in diagnoses of FHV1 infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume13
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1999
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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