Prevalence of antibodies to western equine encephalomyelitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses in residents of California exposed to sporadic and consistent enzootic transmission

William Reisen, Robert E. Chiles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sera from outpatients attending county health department clinics in areas of California with consistent (Imperial Valley) and sporadic (Sacramento Valley) enzootic transmission of western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses exhibited neutralizing antibody prevalence rates of 1.3% (n = 690) and 0.5% (n = 1,066) for WEE and 11.0% and 0.8% for SLE, respectively. Seroprevalence for SLE virus in Imperial County increased as a function of both age and years of residence, indicating that this virus was endemic with a low rate of annual infection. Of 26 sera that tested positive for SLE virus antibody by an enzyme immunoassay, but were negative by plaque reduction neutralization test, 14 (53%) had neutralizing antibody that reacted with ≤ one type of dengue (DEN) virus. The DEN virus infections presumably were acquired elsewhere because neither the vectors nor DEN virus transmission occurs in California. The low prevalence of neutralizing antibody for WEE and SLE in the California human population indicated that despite recent increases in enzootic transmission, contact between humans and infectious mosquitoes have remained low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-529
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Western Equine Encephalomyelitis
St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses
Dengue Virus
St. Louis Encephalitis
Neutralizing Antibodies
Antibodies
Neutralization Tests
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Virus Diseases
Culicidae
Serum
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Outpatients
Viruses
Health
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

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abstract = "Sera from outpatients attending county health department clinics in areas of California with consistent (Imperial Valley) and sporadic (Sacramento Valley) enzootic transmission of western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses exhibited neutralizing antibody prevalence rates of 1.3{\%} (n = 690) and 0.5{\%} (n = 1,066) for WEE and 11.0{\%} and 0.8{\%} for SLE, respectively. Seroprevalence for SLE virus in Imperial County increased as a function of both age and years of residence, indicating that this virus was endemic with a low rate of annual infection. Of 26 sera that tested positive for SLE virus antibody by an enzyme immunoassay, but were negative by plaque reduction neutralization test, 14 (53{\%}) had neutralizing antibody that reacted with ≤ one type of dengue (DEN) virus. The DEN virus infections presumably were acquired elsewhere because neither the vectors nor DEN virus transmission occurs in California. The low prevalence of neutralizing antibody for WEE and SLE in the California human population indicated that despite recent increases in enzootic transmission, contact between humans and infectious mosquitoes have remained low.",
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