Prevalence of and risk factors for isolation of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from dogs with pyoderma in northern California, USA

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Abstract

Background - Canine pyodermas associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (MRS) have increased in prevalence over the past decade. Hypothesis/Objectives - To compare the prevalence of MRS isolation from dogs with superficial pyoderma at a primary care clinic (PCC) and those at a tertiary care facility (VMTH) in California, USA, and identify associated risk factors. Animals - Client-owned dogs from the VMTH (80 dogs) and the PCC (30 dogs). Methods - Aerobic bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility were performed on swab specimens collected from dogs, and meticillin resistance was determined using microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A mecA gene PCR assay was used to confirm meticillin resistance when possible. Results - Of 89 staphylococcal isolates from the VMTH, 34 (38.2%) were meticillin resistant. In 31 dogs, pyoderma persisted, and one or more follow-up isolates were obtained. The species isolated and drug susceptibility changed unpredictably during treatment. Of 33 PCC isolates, nine (27.3%) were meticillin resistant. Multiple drug resistance was identified in 41 of 53 (77.3%) MRS isolates from the VMTH and five of nine from the PCC. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for the detection of meticillin resistance was 34 of 39 (87%) and 86 of 87 (99%), respectively. Risk factors for meticillin resistance for both sites were antibiotic treatment within the last year (P=0.001), and for VMTH, hospitalization of dogs within the last year (P=0.001). Conclusions and clinical importance - The prevalence of meticillin resistance was not different between VMTH and PCC isolates (P=0.29). Previous antimicrobial therapy was an important risk factor for the isolation of MRS at both sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Dermatology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Pyoderma
pyoderma
Methicillin
methicillin
Staphylococcus
risk factors
Dogs
dogs
Primary Health Care
antibiotics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Polymerase Chain Reaction
multiple drug resistance
Multiple Drug Resistance
Tertiary Healthcare
drug therapy
Canidae
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{3b8eca1c44c747eabe5fc54815077537,
title = "Prevalence of and risk factors for isolation of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from dogs with pyoderma in northern California, USA",
abstract = "Background - Canine pyodermas associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (MRS) have increased in prevalence over the past decade. Hypothesis/Objectives - To compare the prevalence of MRS isolation from dogs with superficial pyoderma at a primary care clinic (PCC) and those at a tertiary care facility (VMTH) in California, USA, and identify associated risk factors. Animals - Client-owned dogs from the VMTH (80 dogs) and the PCC (30 dogs). Methods - Aerobic bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility were performed on swab specimens collected from dogs, and meticillin resistance was determined using microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A mecA gene PCR assay was used to confirm meticillin resistance when possible. Results - Of 89 staphylococcal isolates from the VMTH, 34 (38.2{\%}) were meticillin resistant. In 31 dogs, pyoderma persisted, and one or more follow-up isolates were obtained. The species isolated and drug susceptibility changed unpredictably during treatment. Of 33 PCC isolates, nine (27.3{\%}) were meticillin resistant. Multiple drug resistance was identified in 41 of 53 (77.3{\%}) MRS isolates from the VMTH and five of nine from the PCC. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for the detection of meticillin resistance was 34 of 39 (87{\%}) and 86 of 87 (99{\%}), respectively. Risk factors for meticillin resistance for both sites were antibiotic treatment within the last year (P=0.001), and for VMTH, hospitalization of dogs within the last year (P=0.001). Conclusions and clinical importance - The prevalence of meticillin resistance was not different between VMTH and PCC isolates (P=0.29). Previous antimicrobial therapy was an important risk factor for the isolation of MRS at both sites.",
author = "Eckholm, {Nicole G.} and Outerbridge, {Catherine A} and White, {Stephen D} and Sykes, {Jane E}",
year = "2013",
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doi = "10.1111/j.1365-3164.2012.01051.x",
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journal = "Veterinary Dermatology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of and risk factors for isolation of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from dogs with pyoderma in northern California, USA

AU - Eckholm, Nicole G.

AU - Outerbridge, Catherine A

AU - White, Stephen D

AU - Sykes, Jane E

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Background - Canine pyodermas associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (MRS) have increased in prevalence over the past decade. Hypothesis/Objectives - To compare the prevalence of MRS isolation from dogs with superficial pyoderma at a primary care clinic (PCC) and those at a tertiary care facility (VMTH) in California, USA, and identify associated risk factors. Animals - Client-owned dogs from the VMTH (80 dogs) and the PCC (30 dogs). Methods - Aerobic bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility were performed on swab specimens collected from dogs, and meticillin resistance was determined using microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A mecA gene PCR assay was used to confirm meticillin resistance when possible. Results - Of 89 staphylococcal isolates from the VMTH, 34 (38.2%) were meticillin resistant. In 31 dogs, pyoderma persisted, and one or more follow-up isolates were obtained. The species isolated and drug susceptibility changed unpredictably during treatment. Of 33 PCC isolates, nine (27.3%) were meticillin resistant. Multiple drug resistance was identified in 41 of 53 (77.3%) MRS isolates from the VMTH and five of nine from the PCC. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for the detection of meticillin resistance was 34 of 39 (87%) and 86 of 87 (99%), respectively. Risk factors for meticillin resistance for both sites were antibiotic treatment within the last year (P=0.001), and for VMTH, hospitalization of dogs within the last year (P=0.001). Conclusions and clinical importance - The prevalence of meticillin resistance was not different between VMTH and PCC isolates (P=0.29). Previous antimicrobial therapy was an important risk factor for the isolation of MRS at both sites.

AB - Background - Canine pyodermas associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. (MRS) have increased in prevalence over the past decade. Hypothesis/Objectives - To compare the prevalence of MRS isolation from dogs with superficial pyoderma at a primary care clinic (PCC) and those at a tertiary care facility (VMTH) in California, USA, and identify associated risk factors. Animals - Client-owned dogs from the VMTH (80 dogs) and the PCC (30 dogs). Methods - Aerobic bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility were performed on swab specimens collected from dogs, and meticillin resistance was determined using microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A mecA gene PCR assay was used to confirm meticillin resistance when possible. Results - Of 89 staphylococcal isolates from the VMTH, 34 (38.2%) were meticillin resistant. In 31 dogs, pyoderma persisted, and one or more follow-up isolates were obtained. The species isolated and drug susceptibility changed unpredictably during treatment. Of 33 PCC isolates, nine (27.3%) were meticillin resistant. Multiple drug resistance was identified in 41 of 53 (77.3%) MRS isolates from the VMTH and five of nine from the PCC. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for the detection of meticillin resistance was 34 of 39 (87%) and 86 of 87 (99%), respectively. Risk factors for meticillin resistance for both sites were antibiotic treatment within the last year (P=0.001), and for VMTH, hospitalization of dogs within the last year (P=0.001). Conclusions and clinical importance - The prevalence of meticillin resistance was not different between VMTH and PCC isolates (P=0.29). Previous antimicrobial therapy was an important risk factor for the isolation of MRS at both sites.

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U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2012.01051.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2012.01051.x

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VL - 24

JO - Veterinary Dermatology

JF - Veterinary Dermatology

SN - 0959-4493

IS - 1

ER -