Prevalence, distribution, and progression of radiographic abnormalities in the lungs of cold-stunned Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii): 89 cases (2002-2005)

Jonathan Stockman, Charles J. Innis, Mauricio Solano, Jennifer O Sullivan Brisson, Philip H Kass, Michael F. Tlusty, E. Scott Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective-To evaluate the prevalence, distribution, and progression of radiographic abnormalities in the lungs of cold-stunned Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) and associations between these abnormalities and body weight, carapace length, and hematologic and plasma biochemical variables. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-89 cold-stunned juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed. Dorsoventral and horizontal beam craniocaudal radiographs were evaluated for the presence, distribution, and progression of lung abnormalities. Turtles were categorized as having radiographically normal or abnormal lungs; those with abnormalities detected were further categorized according to the distribution of abnormalities (left lung, right lung, or both affected). Body weight, carapace length, and hematologic and plasma biochemical data were compared among categories. Results-48 of 89 (54%) turtles had radiographic abnormalities of the lungs. Unilateral abnormalities of the right or left lung were detected in 14 (16%) and 2 (2%), respectively; both lungs were affected in 32 (36%). Prevalence of unilateral abnormalities was significantly greater for the right lung than for the left lung. Evaluation of follow-up radiographs indicated clinical improvement over time for most (18/31 [58%]) turtles. Prevalence of bilateral radiographic abnormalities was positively correlated with body weight and carapace length. There was no significant association between radiographic category and hematologic or plasma biochemical variables. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Radiographic abnormalities of the lungs were commonly detected in cold-stunned Kemp's ridley turtles. Results of this study may aid clinicians in developing effective diagnostic and treatment plans for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume242
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence, distribution, and progression of radiographic abnormalities in the lungs of cold-stunned Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii): 89 cases (2002-2005)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this