Prevalence and Social-Ecological Correlates of Intimate Partner Violence in a Conflict Zone—Evidence From the 2015 Afghanistan Demographic and Health Survey

Qais Alemi, Carl Stempel, Susanne Montgomery, Patrick M. Koga, Valerie Smith, Kelly Baek, Catherine C. Fisher, Nipher Malika

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence and social-ecological correlates of male-to-female intimate partner violence (IPV) in Afghanistan. Using data from the 2015 Afghanistan Demographic and Health Survey, which included 20,793 currently married women, we found that the past-year prevalence of physical IPV was highest (46%), followed by emotional (34%) and sexual forms (6%). Results also showed that the risk of IPV in general was associated with an array of community and societal-, family and relationship-, and person-level factors. Our findings point to potential intervention targets for women in this conflict zone where IPV is a highly pervasive and complex societal challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalViolence Against Women
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Afghanistan
  • domestic
  • partner
  • violence
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence and Social-Ecological Correlates of Intimate Partner Violence in a Conflict Zone—Evidence From the 2015 Afghanistan Demographic and Health Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this