Prevalence and potential impact of Toxoplasma gondii on the endangered amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis), California, USA

Amanda Poulsen, Heather Fritz, Deana L. Clifford, Patricia A Conrad, Austin Roy, Elle Glueckert, Janet E Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in 2011–15 to assess its potential threat on the endangered Amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis) in California, US. Surveillance was simultaneously performed on populations of syntopic rodent species. We detected antibodies to T. gondii in sera from 10.5% of 135 wild-caught Amargosa voles; 8% of 95 blood samples were PCR-positive for the T. gondii B1 gene, and 5.0% of 140 sympatric rodent brain samples were PCR-positive. Exposure to T. gondii did not change the probability that an animal would be recaptured in the field study. Behavioral response to domestic cat (Felis catus) and bobcat (Lynx rufus) urine was evaluated in five nonendangered Owens Valley voles (Microtus californicus vallicola) as surrogates for Amargosa voles and seven uninfected controls. Voles showed mild attraction to mouse urine and had neutral reactions to domestic cat urine whether or not infected. Time spent near bobcat urine was approximately twice as high in infected than in uninfected voles (although not statistically significant). The presence of T. gondii in wild Amargosa vole and sympatric rodent populations may hinder the endangered Amargosa vole population’s ability to recover in the wild.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-72
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Wildlife Diseases
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Toxoplasma gondii
urine
rodent
Lynx rufus
rodents
cats
behavioral response
antibody
brain
serum
blood
valley
voles
Microtus californicus
gene
animal
blood serum
valleys
sampling
antibodies

Keywords

  • Amargosa vole
  • Behavior
  • Microtus californicus
  • Toxoplasma gondii

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Prevalence and potential impact of Toxoplasma gondii on the endangered amargosa vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis), California, USA. / Poulsen, Amanda; Fritz, Heather; Clifford, Deana L.; Conrad, Patricia A; Roy, Austin; Glueckert, Elle; Foley, Janet E.

In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 62-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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