Pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism: 210 Cases (1987-2004)

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Abstract

Objective - To evaluate pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with naturally occurring primary hyperparathyroidism. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 210 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism and 200 randomly selected, age-matched control dogs that did not have primary hyperparathyroidism. Procedure - Medical records for dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed for signalment; clinical features; and results of clinicopathologic testing, serum parathyroid hormone assays, and diagnostic imaging. Results - Mean age of the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism was 11.2 years (range, 6 to 17 years). The most common clinical signs were attributable to urolithiasis or urinary tract infection (ie, straining to urinate, increased frequency of urination, and hematuria). Most dogs (149 [71 %]) did not have any observable abnormalities on physical examination. All dogs had hypercalcemia, and most (136 [65%]) had hypophosphatemia. Overall, 200 of the 210 (95%) dogs had BUN and serum creatinine concentrations within or less than the reference range, and serum parathyroid hormone concentration was within reference limits in 135 of 185 (73%) dogs in which it was measured. Urolithiasis was identified in 65 (31%) dogs, and urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 61 (29%). Mean serum total calcium concentration for the control dogs was significantly lower than mean concentration for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but mean BUN and serum creatinine concentrations for the control dogs were both significantly higher than concentrations for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that urolithiasis and urinary tract infection may be associated with hypercalcemia in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but that development of renal insufficiency is uncommon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)756-761
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume227
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

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hyperparathyroidism
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
pretreatment
Dogs
dogs
urinary tract diseases
Urolithiasis
Urinary Tract Infections
hypercalcemia
Serum
parathyroid hormone
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Hypercalcemia
Parathyroid Hormone
creatinine
Creatinine
Hypophosphatemia
urination
hematuria
Urination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism: 210 Cases (1987-2004)",
abstract = "Objective - To evaluate pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with naturally occurring primary hyperparathyroidism. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 210 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism and 200 randomly selected, age-matched control dogs that did not have primary hyperparathyroidism. Procedure - Medical records for dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed for signalment; clinical features; and results of clinicopathologic testing, serum parathyroid hormone assays, and diagnostic imaging. Results - Mean age of the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism was 11.2 years (range, 6 to 17 years). The most common clinical signs were attributable to urolithiasis or urinary tract infection (ie, straining to urinate, increased frequency of urination, and hematuria). Most dogs (149 [71 {\%}]) did not have any observable abnormalities on physical examination. All dogs had hypercalcemia, and most (136 [65{\%}]) had hypophosphatemia. Overall, 200 of the 210 (95{\%}) dogs had BUN and serum creatinine concentrations within or less than the reference range, and serum parathyroid hormone concentration was within reference limits in 135 of 185 (73{\%}) dogs in which it was measured. Urolithiasis was identified in 65 (31{\%}) dogs, and urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 61 (29{\%}). Mean serum total calcium concentration for the control dogs was significantly lower than mean concentration for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but mean BUN and serum creatinine concentrations for the control dogs were both significantly higher than concentrations for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that urolithiasis and urinary tract infection may be associated with hypercalcemia in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but that development of renal insufficiency is uncommon.",
author = "Feldman, {Edward C} and Bruce Hoar and Pollard, {Rachel E} and Nelson, {Richard W}",
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T1 - Pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism

T2 - 210 Cases (1987-2004)

AU - Feldman, Edward C

AU - Hoar, Bruce

AU - Pollard, Rachel E

AU - Nelson, Richard W

PY - 2005/9/1

Y1 - 2005/9/1

N2 - Objective - To evaluate pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with naturally occurring primary hyperparathyroidism. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 210 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism and 200 randomly selected, age-matched control dogs that did not have primary hyperparathyroidism. Procedure - Medical records for dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed for signalment; clinical features; and results of clinicopathologic testing, serum parathyroid hormone assays, and diagnostic imaging. Results - Mean age of the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism was 11.2 years (range, 6 to 17 years). The most common clinical signs were attributable to urolithiasis or urinary tract infection (ie, straining to urinate, increased frequency of urination, and hematuria). Most dogs (149 [71 %]) did not have any observable abnormalities on physical examination. All dogs had hypercalcemia, and most (136 [65%]) had hypophosphatemia. Overall, 200 of the 210 (95%) dogs had BUN and serum creatinine concentrations within or less than the reference range, and serum parathyroid hormone concentration was within reference limits in 135 of 185 (73%) dogs in which it was measured. Urolithiasis was identified in 65 (31%) dogs, and urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 61 (29%). Mean serum total calcium concentration for the control dogs was significantly lower than mean concentration for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but mean BUN and serum creatinine concentrations for the control dogs were both significantly higher than concentrations for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that urolithiasis and urinary tract infection may be associated with hypercalcemia in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but that development of renal insufficiency is uncommon.

AB - Objective - To evaluate pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in dogs with naturally occurring primary hyperparathyroidism. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 210 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism and 200 randomly selected, age-matched control dogs that did not have primary hyperparathyroidism. Procedure - Medical records for dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed for signalment; clinical features; and results of clinicopathologic testing, serum parathyroid hormone assays, and diagnostic imaging. Results - Mean age of the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism was 11.2 years (range, 6 to 17 years). The most common clinical signs were attributable to urolithiasis or urinary tract infection (ie, straining to urinate, increased frequency of urination, and hematuria). Most dogs (149 [71 %]) did not have any observable abnormalities on physical examination. All dogs had hypercalcemia, and most (136 [65%]) had hypophosphatemia. Overall, 200 of the 210 (95%) dogs had BUN and serum creatinine concentrations within or less than the reference range, and serum parathyroid hormone concentration was within reference limits in 135 of 185 (73%) dogs in which it was measured. Urolithiasis was identified in 65 (31%) dogs, and urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 61 (29%). Mean serum total calcium concentration for the control dogs was significantly lower than mean concentration for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but mean BUN and serum creatinine concentrations for the control dogs were both significantly higher than concentrations for the dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that urolithiasis and urinary tract infection may be associated with hypercalcemia in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism, but that development of renal insufficiency is uncommon.

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