Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease: Usefulness for amyloid imaging

Brittany Dugger, Geidy E. Serrano, Lucia I. Sue, Douglas G. Walker, Charles H. Adler, Holly A. Shill, Marwan N. Sabbagh, John N. Caviness, Jose Hidalgo, Megan Saxon-LaBelle, Glenn Chiarolanza, Monica Mariner, Jonette Henry-Watson, Thomas G. Beach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to AD. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically- confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N = 40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p < 0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-65
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Parkinson's Disease
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Corpus Striatum
Amyloid Plaques
Amyloid
Parkinson Disease
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Cerebral Cortex
Pathology
Lewy Bodies
Coloring Agents

Keywords

  • autopsy
  • biomarker
  • diagnosis
  • Lewy body
  • neuropathology
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease : Usefulness for amyloid imaging. / Dugger, Brittany; Serrano, Geidy E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Walker, Douglas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Caviness, John N.; Hidalgo, Jose; Saxon-LaBelle, Megan; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Mariner, Monica; Henry-Watson, Jonette; Beach, Thomas G.

In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, Vol. 2, No. 1, 09.04.2012, p. 57-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dugger, B, Serrano, GE, Sue, LI, Walker, DG, Adler, CH, Shill, HA, Sabbagh, MN, Caviness, JN, Hidalgo, J, Saxon-LaBelle, M, Chiarolanza, G, Mariner, M, Henry-Watson, J & Beach, TG 2012, 'Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease: Usefulness for amyloid imaging', Journal of Parkinson's Disease, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 57-65. https://doi.org/10.3233/JPD-2012-11073
Dugger, Brittany ; Serrano, Geidy E. ; Sue, Lucia I. ; Walker, Douglas G. ; Adler, Charles H. ; Shill, Holly A. ; Sabbagh, Marwan N. ; Caviness, John N. ; Hidalgo, Jose ; Saxon-LaBelle, Megan ; Chiarolanza, Glenn ; Mariner, Monica ; Henry-Watson, Jonette ; Beach, Thomas G. / Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease : Usefulness for amyloid imaging. In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 57-65.
@article{1290e0c530084505900a24a2b75f5402,
title = "Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease: Usefulness for amyloid imaging",
abstract = "Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to AD. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically- confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N = 40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p < 0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80{\%} sensitive and 80{\%} specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100{\%}) but had poor specificity (48{\%} to 55{\%}). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.",
keywords = "autopsy, biomarker, diagnosis, Lewy body, neuropathology, Striatum",
author = "Brittany Dugger and Serrano, {Geidy E.} and Sue, {Lucia I.} and Walker, {Douglas G.} and Adler, {Charles H.} and Shill, {Holly A.} and Sabbagh, {Marwan N.} and Caviness, {John N.} and Jose Hidalgo and Megan Saxon-LaBelle and Glenn Chiarolanza and Monica Mariner and Jonette Henry-Watson and Beach, {Thomas G.}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "9",
doi = "10.3233/JPD-2012-11073",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "57--65",
journal = "Journal of Parkinson's Disease",
issn = "1877-7171",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Presence of striatal amyloid plaques in Parkinson's disease dementia predicts concomitant Alzheimer's disease

T2 - Usefulness for amyloid imaging

AU - Dugger, Brittany

AU - Serrano, Geidy E.

AU - Sue, Lucia I.

AU - Walker, Douglas G.

AU - Adler, Charles H.

AU - Shill, Holly A.

AU - Sabbagh, Marwan N.

AU - Caviness, John N.

AU - Hidalgo, Jose

AU - Saxon-LaBelle, Megan

AU - Chiarolanza, Glenn

AU - Mariner, Monica

AU - Henry-Watson, Jonette

AU - Beach, Thomas G.

PY - 2012/4/9

Y1 - 2012/4/9

N2 - Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to AD. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically- confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N = 40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p < 0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.

AB - Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to AD. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically- confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N = 40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p < 0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.

KW - autopsy

KW - biomarker

KW - diagnosis

KW - Lewy body

KW - neuropathology

KW - Striatum

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859370468&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859370468&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JPD-2012-11073

DO - 10.3233/JPD-2012-11073

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84859370468

VL - 2

SP - 57

EP - 65

JO - Journal of Parkinson's Disease

JF - Journal of Parkinson's Disease

SN - 1877-7171

IS - 1

ER -