Prescription drug monitoring program

Registration and use by prescribers and pharmacists before and after legal mandatory registration, California, 2010-2017

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To estimate the effect of California's prescription drug monitoring program's (PDMP) registration mandate on use of the PDMP. Methods. We evaluated the effect of California's mandatory PDMP registration law by fitting time series models on the percentage of clinicians registered for California's PDMP and the percentage of clinicians who were active PDMP users (users who created ‡ 1 patient prescription reports in a given month) from 2010 through 2017. We also compared PDMP use among early PDMP adopters (clinicians who registered > 8 months before the mandatory registration deadline) versus late adopters (clinicians who registered £ 8 months before the deadline). Results. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in active PDMP users: 53.5% increase for prescribers and 17.9% for pharmacists. Early adopters were 4 times more likely to be active PDMP users than were late adopters. Conclusions. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in PDMP registration and use, but most new registrants did not become active users. Public Health Implications. Mandatory PDMP registration increases PDMP use but does not result in widespread PDMP usage by all clinicians prescribing controlled substances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1669-1674
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume108
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Prescription Drugs
Drug Monitoring
Pharmacists
Controlled Substances
Prescriptions
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{c65fdce070fd4283bd3b471bfb618d45,
title = "Prescription drug monitoring program: Registration and use by prescribers and pharmacists before and after legal mandatory registration, California, 2010-2017",
abstract = "Objectives. To estimate the effect of California's prescription drug monitoring program's (PDMP) registration mandate on use of the PDMP. Methods. We evaluated the effect of California's mandatory PDMP registration law by fitting time series models on the percentage of clinicians registered for California's PDMP and the percentage of clinicians who were active PDMP users (users who created ‡ 1 patient prescription reports in a given month) from 2010 through 2017. We also compared PDMP use among early PDMP adopters (clinicians who registered > 8 months before the mandatory registration deadline) versus late adopters (clinicians who registered £ 8 months before the deadline). Results. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in active PDMP users: 53.5{\%} increase for prescribers and 17.9{\%} for pharmacists. Early adopters were 4 times more likely to be active PDMP users than were late adopters. Conclusions. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in PDMP registration and use, but most new registrants did not become active users. Public Health Implications. Mandatory PDMP registration increases PDMP use but does not result in widespread PDMP usage by all clinicians prescribing controlled substances.",
author = "Shev, {Aaron B.} and Wintemute, {Garen J} and Magdalena Cerda and Andrew Crawford and Stewart, {Susan L} and Henry, {Stephen G}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2018.304704",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "108",
pages = "1669--1674",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Prescription drug monitoring program

T2 - Registration and use by prescribers and pharmacists before and after legal mandatory registration, California, 2010-2017

AU - Shev, Aaron B.

AU - Wintemute, Garen J

AU - Cerda, Magdalena

AU - Crawford, Andrew

AU - Stewart, Susan L

AU - Henry, Stephen G

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Objectives. To estimate the effect of California's prescription drug monitoring program's (PDMP) registration mandate on use of the PDMP. Methods. We evaluated the effect of California's mandatory PDMP registration law by fitting time series models on the percentage of clinicians registered for California's PDMP and the percentage of clinicians who were active PDMP users (users who created ‡ 1 patient prescription reports in a given month) from 2010 through 2017. We also compared PDMP use among early PDMP adopters (clinicians who registered > 8 months before the mandatory registration deadline) versus late adopters (clinicians who registered £ 8 months before the deadline). Results. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in active PDMP users: 53.5% increase for prescribers and 17.9% for pharmacists. Early adopters were 4 times more likely to be active PDMP users than were late adopters. Conclusions. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in PDMP registration and use, but most new registrants did not become active users. Public Health Implications. Mandatory PDMP registration increases PDMP use but does not result in widespread PDMP usage by all clinicians prescribing controlled substances.

AB - Objectives. To estimate the effect of California's prescription drug monitoring program's (PDMP) registration mandate on use of the PDMP. Methods. We evaluated the effect of California's mandatory PDMP registration law by fitting time series models on the percentage of clinicians registered for California's PDMP and the percentage of clinicians who were active PDMP users (users who created ‡ 1 patient prescription reports in a given month) from 2010 through 2017. We also compared PDMP use among early PDMP adopters (clinicians who registered > 8 months before the mandatory registration deadline) versus late adopters (clinicians who registered £ 8 months before the deadline). Results. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in active PDMP users: 53.5% increase for prescribers and 17.9% for pharmacists. Early adopters were 4 times more likely to be active PDMP users than were late adopters. Conclusions. Mandatory registration was associated with increases in PDMP registration and use, but most new registrants did not become active users. Public Health Implications. Mandatory PDMP registration increases PDMP use but does not result in widespread PDMP usage by all clinicians prescribing controlled substances.

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JO - American Journal of Public Health

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