Preoperative 3D modeling and printing for guiding periacetabular osteotomy

Trevor J. Shelton, Shafagh Monazzam, Arash Calafi, Holly B. Leshikar, Brian M. Haus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:Achieving adequate acetabular correction in multiple planes is essential to the success of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). Three-dimensional (3D) modeling and printing has the potential to improve preoperative planning by accurately guiding intraoperative correction. The authors therefore asked the following questions: (1) For a patient undergoing a PAO, does use of 3D modeling with intraoperative 3D-printed models create a reproducible surgical plan to obtain predetermined parameters of correction including lateral center edge angle (LCEA), anterior center edge angle (ACEA), Tonnis angle, and femoral head extrusion index (FHEI)? and (2) Can 3D computer modeling accurately predict when a normalized FHEI can be achieved without the need for a concomitant femoral-sided osteotomy?Methods:A retrospective review was conducted on 42 consecutive patients that underwent a PAO. 3D modeling software was utilized to simulate a PAO in order to achieve normal LCEA, ACEA, Tonnis angle, and FHEI. If adequate FHEI was not achieved, a femoral osteotomy was simulated. 3D models were printed as intraoperative guides. Preoperative, simulated and postoperative radiographic ACEA, LCEA, Tonnis angle, and FHEI were measured and compared statistically.Results:A total of 40 patients had a traditional PAO, and 2 had an anteverting-PAO. The simulated LCEA, ACEA, Tonnis angle, and FHEI were within a median difference of 3 degrees, 1 degrees, 1 degrees, and 0% of postoperative values, respectively, and showed no statistical difference. Of those that had a traditional PAO, all 34 patients were correctly predicted to need a traditional acetabular-sided correction alone and the other 6 were correctly predicted to need a concomitant femoral osteotomy for a correct prediction in 100% of patients.Conclusion:This study demonstrates that for PAO surgery, 3D modeling and printing allow the surgeon to accurately create a reproducible surgical plan to obtain predetermined postoperative hip coverage parameters. This new technology has the potential to improve preoperative/intraoperative decision making for hip dysplasia and other complex disorders of the hip.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-158
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • 3D modeling
  • 3D printing
  • Hip dysplasia
  • PAO
  • Periacetabular osteotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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