Preferences of women evaluating risks of tamoxifen (POWER) study of preferences for tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction

Joy Melnikow, Debora A Paterniti, Rahman Azari, Christina Kuenneth, Stephen Birch, Miriam Kuppermann, James Nuovo, Janet Keyzer, Stuart Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to understand the attitudes and preferences of risk-eligible women regarding use of tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. METHODS. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods interview study was conducted at a university medical center and at community sites. Participants were women who had an estimated 5-year breast cancer risk ≥ 1.7% and no prior breast cancer. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The interview included a 15-minute, standardized educational session on the potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen followed by close-ended and open-ended questions about participants' inclinations to take tamoxifen and factors important to their decision. A demographic questionnaire, a test on knowledge of potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen, and an interview evaluation were included. RESULTS. Two hundred fifty-five women completed interviews. Their estimated mean 5-year breast cancer risk was 2.8%; and their mean self-perceived 5-year risk was 32.7%. After the educational intervention, 45 women (17.6%) were inclined to take tamoxifen. Very high risk women (> 3.5%) were no more inclined to take it than women with lower risk (1.7-3.5%). In a multivariable analysis, lower income, confidence in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, and concern about fractures were associated with being inclined to take it; concern about pulmonary embolism, dyspareunia, cataracts, and low self-perceived breast cancer risk were associated negatively with taking tamoxifen. Participants expressed concerns about adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS. Less than 20% of women were interested in tamoxifen after education about potential benefits and harms, despite a very high self-perceived breast cancer risk. Candidate chemoprevention agents must have few potential adverse effects to achieve widespread acceptance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1996-2005
Number of pages10
JournalCancer
Volume103
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2005

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Tamoxifen
Risk Reduction Behavior
Breast Neoplasms
Interviews
Dyspareunia
Chemoprevention
Pulmonary Embolism
Cataract
Demography
Education

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Decision making
  • Prevention and control
  • Tamoxifen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Preferences of women evaluating risks of tamoxifen (POWER) study of preferences for tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. / Melnikow, Joy; Paterniti, Debora A; Azari, Rahman; Kuenneth, Christina; Birch, Stephen; Kuppermann, Miriam; Nuovo, James; Keyzer, Janet; Henderson, Stuart.

In: Cancer, Vol. 103, No. 10, 15.05.2005, p. 1996-2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melnikow, Joy ; Paterniti, Debora A ; Azari, Rahman ; Kuenneth, Christina ; Birch, Stephen ; Kuppermann, Miriam ; Nuovo, James ; Keyzer, Janet ; Henderson, Stuart. / Preferences of women evaluating risks of tamoxifen (POWER) study of preferences for tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. In: Cancer. 2005 ; Vol. 103, No. 10. pp. 1996-2005.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to understand the attitudes and preferences of risk-eligible women regarding use of tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. METHODS. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods interview study was conducted at a university medical center and at community sites. Participants were women who had an estimated 5-year breast cancer risk ≥ 1.7{\%} and no prior breast cancer. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The interview included a 15-minute, standardized educational session on the potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen followed by close-ended and open-ended questions about participants' inclinations to take tamoxifen and factors important to their decision. A demographic questionnaire, a test on knowledge of potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen, and an interview evaluation were included. RESULTS. Two hundred fifty-five women completed interviews. Their estimated mean 5-year breast cancer risk was 2.8{\%}; and their mean self-perceived 5-year risk was 32.7{\%}. After the educational intervention, 45 women (17.6{\%}) were inclined to take tamoxifen. Very high risk women (> 3.5{\%}) were no more inclined to take it than women with lower risk (1.7-3.5{\%}). In a multivariable analysis, lower income, confidence in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, and concern about fractures were associated with being inclined to take it; concern about pulmonary embolism, dyspareunia, cataracts, and low self-perceived breast cancer risk were associated negatively with taking tamoxifen. Participants expressed concerns about adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS. Less than 20{\%} of women were interested in tamoxifen after education about potential benefits and harms, despite a very high self-perceived breast cancer risk. Candidate chemoprevention agents must have few potential adverse effects to achieve widespread acceptance.",
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AU - Melnikow, Joy

AU - Paterniti, Debora A

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AU - Kuenneth, Christina

AU - Birch, Stephen

AU - Kuppermann, Miriam

AU - Nuovo, James

AU - Keyzer, Janet

AU - Henderson, Stuart

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N2 - BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to understand the attitudes and preferences of risk-eligible women regarding use of tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. METHODS. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods interview study was conducted at a university medical center and at community sites. Participants were women who had an estimated 5-year breast cancer risk ≥ 1.7% and no prior breast cancer. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The interview included a 15-minute, standardized educational session on the potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen followed by close-ended and open-ended questions about participants' inclinations to take tamoxifen and factors important to their decision. A demographic questionnaire, a test on knowledge of potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen, and an interview evaluation were included. RESULTS. Two hundred fifty-five women completed interviews. Their estimated mean 5-year breast cancer risk was 2.8%; and their mean self-perceived 5-year risk was 32.7%. After the educational intervention, 45 women (17.6%) were inclined to take tamoxifen. Very high risk women (> 3.5%) were no more inclined to take it than women with lower risk (1.7-3.5%). In a multivariable analysis, lower income, confidence in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, and concern about fractures were associated with being inclined to take it; concern about pulmonary embolism, dyspareunia, cataracts, and low self-perceived breast cancer risk were associated negatively with taking tamoxifen. Participants expressed concerns about adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS. Less than 20% of women were interested in tamoxifen after education about potential benefits and harms, despite a very high self-perceived breast cancer risk. Candidate chemoprevention agents must have few potential adverse effects to achieve widespread acceptance.

AB - BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to understand the attitudes and preferences of risk-eligible women regarding use of tamoxifen for breast cancer risk reduction. METHODS. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods interview study was conducted at a university medical center and at community sites. Participants were women who had an estimated 5-year breast cancer risk ≥ 1.7% and no prior breast cancer. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The interview included a 15-minute, standardized educational session on the potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen followed by close-ended and open-ended questions about participants' inclinations to take tamoxifen and factors important to their decision. A demographic questionnaire, a test on knowledge of potential benefits and harms of tamoxifen, and an interview evaluation were included. RESULTS. Two hundred fifty-five women completed interviews. Their estimated mean 5-year breast cancer risk was 2.8%; and their mean self-perceived 5-year risk was 32.7%. After the educational intervention, 45 women (17.6%) were inclined to take tamoxifen. Very high risk women (> 3.5%) were no more inclined to take it than women with lower risk (1.7-3.5%). In a multivariable analysis, lower income, confidence in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, and concern about fractures were associated with being inclined to take it; concern about pulmonary embolism, dyspareunia, cataracts, and low self-perceived breast cancer risk were associated negatively with taking tamoxifen. Participants expressed concerns about adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS. Less than 20% of women were interested in tamoxifen after education about potential benefits and harms, despite a very high self-perceived breast cancer risk. Candidate chemoprevention agents must have few potential adverse effects to achieve widespread acceptance.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Decision making

KW - Prevention and control

KW - Tamoxifen

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