Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults

Jin E. Kim-Mozeleski, Janice Y. Tsoh, Ginny Gildengorin, Lien H. Cao, Tiffany Ho, Sarita Kohli, Hy Lam, Ching Wong, Susan L Stewart, Stephen J. McPhee, Tung T. Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Culture impacts help-seeking preferences. We examined Vietnamese Americans’ help-seeking preferences for depressive symptoms, through a telephone survey (N = 1666). A vignette describing an age- and gender-matched individual with depression was presented, and respondents chose from a list of options and provided open-ended responses about their help-seeking preferences. Results showed that 78.3% would seek professional help, either from a family doctor, a mental health provider, or both; 54.4% preferred to seek help from a family doctor but not from a mental health provider. Most (82.1%) would prefer to talk to family or friends, 62.2% would prefer to look up information, and 50.1% would prefer to get spiritual help. Logistic regression analysis revealed that preferences for non-professional help-seeking options (such as talking to friends or family, looking up information, and getting spiritual help), health care access, and perceived poor health, were associated with increased odds of preferring professional help-seeking. This population-based study of Vietnamese Americans highlight promising channels to deliver education about depression and effective help-seeking resources, particularly the importance of family doctors and social networks. Furthermore, addressing barriers in access to care remains a critical component of promoting professional help-seeking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)748-756
Number of pages9
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Asian Americans
Depression
Mental Health
mental health
Telephone
Social Support
telephone
social network
regression analysis
Logistic Models
logistics
Regression Analysis
health care
Delivery of Health Care
Education
gender
Health
health
resources
Population

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Help-seeking
  • Mental health
  • Vietnamese Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kim-Mozeleski, J. E., Tsoh, J. Y., Gildengorin, G., Cao, L. H., Ho, T., Kohli, S., ... Nguyen, T. T. (2018). Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults. Community Mental Health Journal, 54(6), 748-756. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-017-0199-3

Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults. / Kim-Mozeleski, Jin E.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Gildengorin, Ginny; Cao, Lien H.; Ho, Tiffany; Kohli, Sarita; Lam, Hy; Wong, Ching; Stewart, Susan L; McPhee, Stephen J.; Nguyen, Tung T.

In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.08.2018, p. 748-756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim-Mozeleski, JE, Tsoh, JY, Gildengorin, G, Cao, LH, Ho, T, Kohli, S, Lam, H, Wong, C, Stewart, SL, McPhee, SJ & Nguyen, TT 2018, 'Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults', Community Mental Health Journal, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 748-756. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-017-0199-3
Kim-Mozeleski JE, Tsoh JY, Gildengorin G, Cao LH, Ho T, Kohli S et al. Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults. Community Mental Health Journal. 2018 Aug 1;54(6):748-756. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-017-0199-3
Kim-Mozeleski, Jin E. ; Tsoh, Janice Y. ; Gildengorin, Ginny ; Cao, Lien H. ; Ho, Tiffany ; Kohli, Sarita ; Lam, Hy ; Wong, Ching ; Stewart, Susan L ; McPhee, Stephen J. ; Nguyen, Tung T. / Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults. In: Community Mental Health Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 6. pp. 748-756.
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