Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis

Amal K. Mitra, Jose O. Alvarez, M. A. Wahed, George J. Fuchs, Charles B. Stephensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low serum retinol can be useful as an indicator of depleted liver vitamin A stores, particularly in population-based studies. However, serum retinol concentrations decrease transiently during infection, independent of any changes in liver stores. The magnitude of the decrease in serum retinol is often proportional to indicators of disease severity. Objective: We examined the relation of serum retinol in children with culture-positive shigellosis with severity of illness, anthropometric indicators of nutritional status, urinary retinol excretion, and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, α1-acid glycoprotein, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin. Design: This was a prospective study assessing the clinical and laboratory measurements at admission and recovery of 90 children with dysentery (66 with shigellosis) hospitalized in Bangladesh. Results: Serum retinol concentrations were low at admission but were significantly greater at discharge even though no vitamin A supplements were given during the illness (0.36 ± 0.22 compared with 1.15 ± 0.50 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Serum retinol concentrations were lower in children with Shigella dysenteriae type 1 infection than in children with shigellosis due to less virulent strains of Shigella. Low serum retinol was independently associated with S. dysenteriae type 1, high serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and low weight-forage in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: This study showed that shigellosis was associated with a significant, transient decrease in serum retinol concentrations of ≃0.8 μmol/L, and that this change was significantly associated with severity of disease and poor underlying nutritional status, particularly low weight-for-age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1088-1094
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume68
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1998

Fingerprint

shigellosis
Bacillary Dysentery
Vitamin A
vitamin A
Serum
Shigella dysenteriae
C-reactive protein
Nutritional Status
C-Reactive Protein
disease severity
nutritional status
dysentery
Weights and Measures
Retinol-Binding Proteins
retinol-binding protein
prealbumin
Dysentery
liver
Shigella
Prealbumin

Keywords

  • α-acid glycoprotein
  • Acute phase protein
  • Bangladesh
  • Children
  • Malnutrition
  • Prealbumin
  • Retinol
  • Retinol binding protein
  • Shigella dysenteriae
  • Shigellosis
  • Transthyretin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Mitra, A. K., Alvarez, J. O., Wahed, M. A., Fuchs, G. J., & Stephensen, C. B. (1998). Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 68(5), 1088-1094.

Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis. / Mitra, Amal K.; Alvarez, Jose O.; Wahed, M. A.; Fuchs, George J.; Stephensen, Charles B.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 68, No. 5, 11.1998, p. 1088-1094.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitra, AK, Alvarez, JO, Wahed, MA, Fuchs, GJ & Stephensen, CB 1998, 'Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 1088-1094.
Mitra AK, Alvarez JO, Wahed MA, Fuchs GJ, Stephensen CB. Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1998 Nov;68(5):1088-1094.
Mitra, Amal K. ; Alvarez, Jose O. ; Wahed, M. A. ; Fuchs, George J. ; Stephensen, Charles B. / Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1998 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 1088-1094.
@article{f8ae68cc295f41fab98c93c52ad31195,
title = "Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis",
abstract = "Background: Low serum retinol can be useful as an indicator of depleted liver vitamin A stores, particularly in population-based studies. However, serum retinol concentrations decrease transiently during infection, independent of any changes in liver stores. The magnitude of the decrease in serum retinol is often proportional to indicators of disease severity. Objective: We examined the relation of serum retinol in children with culture-positive shigellosis with severity of illness, anthropometric indicators of nutritional status, urinary retinol excretion, and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, α1-acid glycoprotein, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin. Design: This was a prospective study assessing the clinical and laboratory measurements at admission and recovery of 90 children with dysentery (66 with shigellosis) hospitalized in Bangladesh. Results: Serum retinol concentrations were low at admission but were significantly greater at discharge even though no vitamin A supplements were given during the illness (0.36 ± 0.22 compared with 1.15 ± 0.50 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Serum retinol concentrations were lower in children with Shigella dysenteriae type 1 infection than in children with shigellosis due to less virulent strains of Shigella. Low serum retinol was independently associated with S. dysenteriae type 1, high serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and low weight-forage in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: This study showed that shigellosis was associated with a significant, transient decrease in serum retinol concentrations of ≃0.8 μmol/L, and that this change was significantly associated with severity of disease and poor underlying nutritional status, particularly low weight-for-age.",
keywords = "α-acid glycoprotein, Acute phase protein, Bangladesh, Children, Malnutrition, Prealbumin, Retinol, Retinol binding protein, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigellosis, Transthyretin",
author = "Mitra, {Amal K.} and Alvarez, {Jose O.} and Wahed, {M. A.} and Fuchs, {George J.} and Stephensen, {Charles B.}",
year = "1998",
month = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "1088--1094",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of serum retinol in children with shigellosis

AU - Mitra, Amal K.

AU - Alvarez, Jose O.

AU - Wahed, M. A.

AU - Fuchs, George J.

AU - Stephensen, Charles B.

PY - 1998/11

Y1 - 1998/11

N2 - Background: Low serum retinol can be useful as an indicator of depleted liver vitamin A stores, particularly in population-based studies. However, serum retinol concentrations decrease transiently during infection, independent of any changes in liver stores. The magnitude of the decrease in serum retinol is often proportional to indicators of disease severity. Objective: We examined the relation of serum retinol in children with culture-positive shigellosis with severity of illness, anthropometric indicators of nutritional status, urinary retinol excretion, and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, α1-acid glycoprotein, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin. Design: This was a prospective study assessing the clinical and laboratory measurements at admission and recovery of 90 children with dysentery (66 with shigellosis) hospitalized in Bangladesh. Results: Serum retinol concentrations were low at admission but were significantly greater at discharge even though no vitamin A supplements were given during the illness (0.36 ± 0.22 compared with 1.15 ± 0.50 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Serum retinol concentrations were lower in children with Shigella dysenteriae type 1 infection than in children with shigellosis due to less virulent strains of Shigella. Low serum retinol was independently associated with S. dysenteriae type 1, high serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and low weight-forage in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: This study showed that shigellosis was associated with a significant, transient decrease in serum retinol concentrations of ≃0.8 μmol/L, and that this change was significantly associated with severity of disease and poor underlying nutritional status, particularly low weight-for-age.

AB - Background: Low serum retinol can be useful as an indicator of depleted liver vitamin A stores, particularly in population-based studies. However, serum retinol concentrations decrease transiently during infection, independent of any changes in liver stores. The magnitude of the decrease in serum retinol is often proportional to indicators of disease severity. Objective: We examined the relation of serum retinol in children with culture-positive shigellosis with severity of illness, anthropometric indicators of nutritional status, urinary retinol excretion, and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, α1-acid glycoprotein, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin. Design: This was a prospective study assessing the clinical and laboratory measurements at admission and recovery of 90 children with dysentery (66 with shigellosis) hospitalized in Bangladesh. Results: Serum retinol concentrations were low at admission but were significantly greater at discharge even though no vitamin A supplements were given during the illness (0.36 ± 0.22 compared with 1.15 ± 0.50 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Serum retinol concentrations were lower in children with Shigella dysenteriae type 1 infection than in children with shigellosis due to less virulent strains of Shigella. Low serum retinol was independently associated with S. dysenteriae type 1, high serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and low weight-forage in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: This study showed that shigellosis was associated with a significant, transient decrease in serum retinol concentrations of ≃0.8 μmol/L, and that this change was significantly associated with severity of disease and poor underlying nutritional status, particularly low weight-for-age.

KW - α-acid glycoprotein

KW - Acute phase protein

KW - Bangladesh

KW - Children

KW - Malnutrition

KW - Prealbumin

KW - Retinol

KW - Retinol binding protein

KW - Shigella dysenteriae

KW - Shigellosis

KW - Transthyretin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031785869&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031785869&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 1088

EP - 1094

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 5

ER -