Predictive assay for cancer targets

Amanda Suess, Christine Nguyen, Karen Sorensen, Jennifer Montgomery, Brian Souza, Kris Kulp, Larry Dugan, Allen Christian

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the abovementioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in. the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsB.M. Cullum, J.C. Carter
Volume6007
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventSmart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology III - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 24 2005Oct 26 2005

Other

OtherSmart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology III
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/24/0510/26/05

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Laser Capture Microdissection
  • MALDI-TOF
  • Mass Spectrometry
  • Microarray
  • Peptide
  • Proteomics
  • SELDI-TOF
  • Serum
  • Transcript

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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  • Cite this

    Suess, A., Nguyen, C., Sorensen, K., Montgomery, J., Souza, B., Kulp, K., Dugan, L., & Christian, A. (2005). Predictive assay for cancer targets. In B. M. Cullum, & J. C. Carter (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 6007). [600715] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.630804