PREDICTION OF CANCELLOUS BONE APPARENT DENSITY AND ORIENTATION.

David P Fyhrie, D. R. Carter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The orientation of cancellous bone trabeculae is thought to be a function of the average principal stress directions (the trajectory hypothesis) and the bone apparent density, or bone mass per unit volume, is thought to be related to an effective stress measure. The authors show that the trajectory hypothesis and the relationship between effective stress and apparent density can be derived from a unifying max-min principle involving a quadratic stress function similar in form to strain energy density and the Tsai-Wu criterion. They show that the patterns of cancellous bone apparent density in the femoral head can be predicted from the results of a three dimensional finite element stress analysis using a special strain energy density form of the new theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Bioengineering
EditorsN.A. Langrana
PublisherASME
Pages30-31
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Fyhrie, D. P., & Carter, D. R. (1985). PREDICTION OF CANCELLOUS BONE APPARENT DENSITY AND ORIENTATION. In N. A. Langrana (Ed.), Advances in Bioengineering (pp. 30-31). ASME.