Predicting the Future: Using Simulation Modeling to Forecast Patient Flow on General Medicine Units

Vimal Mishra, Shin-Ping Tu, Joseph Heim, Heather Masters, Lindsey Hall, Ralph R. Clark, Alan W. Dow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hospitals are complex adaptive systems within which multiple components such as patients, practitioners, facilities, and technology interact. A careful approach to optimization of this complex system is needed because any change can result in unexpected deleterious effects. One such approach is discrete event simulation, in which what-if scenarios allow researchers to predict the impact of a proposed change on the system. However, studies illustrating the application of simulation in optimization of general internal medicine (GIM) team inpatient operations are lacking. METHODS: Administrative data about admissions and discharges, data from a time-motion study, and expert opinion on workflow were used to construct the simulation model. Then, the impact of four changes: aligning medical teams with nursing units, adding a hospitalist team, adding a nursing unit, and adding both a nursing unit and hospitalist team with higher admission volume were modeled on key hospital operational metrics. RESULTS: Aligning medical teams with nursing units improved team metrics for aligned teams but shifted patients to unaligned teams. Adding a hospitalist team had little benefit, but adding a nursing unit improved system metrics. Both adding a hospitalist team and a nursing unit would be required to maintain operational metrics with increased patient volume. CONCLUSION: Using simulation modeling, we provided data on the implications of four possible strategic changes on GIM inpatient units, providers, and patient throughput. Such analyses may be a worthwhile investment to study strategic decisions and make better choices with fewer unintended consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 8 2019

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Hospitalists
Team Nursing
Medicine
Nursing
Internal Medicine
Inpatients
Metric System
Time and Motion Studies
Workflow
Expert Testimony
Research Personnel
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

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Predicting the Future : Using Simulation Modeling to Forecast Patient Flow on General Medicine Units. / Mishra, Vimal; Tu, Shin-Ping; Heim, Joseph; Masters, Heather; Hall, Lindsey; Clark, Ralph R.; Dow, Alan W.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 08.01.2019, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mishra, Vimal ; Tu, Shin-Ping ; Heim, Joseph ; Masters, Heather ; Hall, Lindsey ; Clark, Ralph R. ; Dow, Alan W. / Predicting the Future : Using Simulation Modeling to Forecast Patient Flow on General Medicine Units. In: Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 9-15.
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