Prediagnosis reproductive factors and all-cause mortality for women with breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry

Kelly Anne Phillips, Roger L. Milne, Dee W. West, Pamela J. Goodwin, Graham G. Giles, Ellen T. Chang, Jane C. Figueiredo, Michael L. Friedlander, Theresa H Keegan, Gord Glendon, Carmel Apicella, Frances P. O'Malley, Melissa C. Southey, Irene L. Andrulis, Esther M. John, John L. Hopper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have examined the prognostic relevance of reproductive factors before breast cancer diagnosis, but most have been small and their overall findings inconclusive. Associations between reproductive risk factors and all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis were assessed with the use of a population-based cohort of 3,107 women of White European ancestry with invasive breast cancer (1,130 from Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; 1,441 from Ontario, Canada; and 536 from Northern California, United States). During follow-up with a median of 8.5 years, 567 deaths occurred. At recruitment, questionnaire data were collected on oral contraceptive use, number of fullterm pregnancies, age at first full-term pregnancy, time from last full-term pregnancy to breast cancer diagnosis, breastfeeding, age at menarche, and menopause and menopausal status at breast cancer diagnosis. Hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were estimated with the use of Cox proportional hazards models with and without adjustment for age at diagnosis, study center, education, and body mass index. Compared with nulliparous women, those who had a child up to 2 years, or between 2 and 5 years, before their breast cancer diagnosis were more likely to die. The unadjusted hazard ratio estimates were 2.75 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.98-3.83; P < 0.001] and 2.20 (95% CI, 1.65-2.94; P < 0.001), respectively, and the adjusted estimates were 2.25 (95% CI, 1.59-3.18; P < 0.001) and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.35-2.46; P < 0.001), respectively. When evaluating the prognosis of women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, the time since last full-term pregnancy should be routinely considered along with other established host and tumor prognostic factors, but consideration of other reproductive factors may not be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1792-1797
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Registries
Breast Neoplasms
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Pregnancy
Menarche
Ontario
Oral Contraceptives
Menopause
Breast Feeding
Proportional Hazards Models
Canada
Body Mass Index
Education
Population
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Prediagnosis reproductive factors and all-cause mortality for women with breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry. / Phillips, Kelly Anne; Milne, Roger L.; West, Dee W.; Goodwin, Pamela J.; Giles, Graham G.; Chang, Ellen T.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Friedlander, Michael L.; Keegan, Theresa H; Glendon, Gord; Apicella, Carmel; O'Malley, Frances P.; Southey, Melissa C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 1792-1797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Phillips, KA, Milne, RL, West, DW, Goodwin, PJ, Giles, GG, Chang, ET, Figueiredo, JC, Friedlander, ML, Keegan, TH, Glendon, G, Apicella, C, O'Malley, FP, Southey, MC, Andrulis, IL, John, EM & Hopper, JL 2009, 'Prediagnosis reproductive factors and all-cause mortality for women with breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 1792-1797. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-1014
Phillips, Kelly Anne ; Milne, Roger L. ; West, Dee W. ; Goodwin, Pamela J. ; Giles, Graham G. ; Chang, Ellen T. ; Figueiredo, Jane C. ; Friedlander, Michael L. ; Keegan, Theresa H ; Glendon, Gord ; Apicella, Carmel ; O'Malley, Frances P. ; Southey, Melissa C. ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; John, Esther M. ; Hopper, John L. / Prediagnosis reproductive factors and all-cause mortality for women with breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 1792-1797.
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