Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants

Mark Underwood, Karen M. Kalanetra, Nicholas A. Bokulich, Majid Mirmiran, Daniela Barile, Daniel J Tancredi, J. Bruce German, Carlito B Lebrilla, David A. Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of increasing doses of 2 prebiotic oligosaccharides and of an "all-human diet" on the intestinal microbiota of premature infants. METHODS:: Twelve premature infants receiving formula feedings were randomly assigned to receive either galacto-oligosaccharide (F+GOS) or a pooled concentrated donor human milk product containing human milk oligosaccharides (F+HMO) in increasing doses during a 5-week period. A second group of 15 premature infants received their motherÊs own milk fortified with either a concentrated donor human milk product (H+H) or a bovine powdered fortifier (H+B). Serial stool specimens from each infant were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial composition. RESULTS:: All of the infants studied had relatively low levels of bifidobacteria and no measurable Lactobacilli. Infants from the F+GOS and F+HMO groups demonstrated an increase in relative numbers of Clostridia with increasing doses. Compared with the H+B group, the infants in the F+HMO and the H+H groups showed an unexpected trend toward an increase in γ-Proteobacteria over time/dose. Principal coordinate analyses and Shannon diversity scores were not significantly different among the 4 groups. Infants in the H+H group received more antibiotics during the study period than those in the other groups. Two of the infants receiving GOS developed feeding intolerance. CONCLUSIONS:: None of the prebiotic interventions resulted in significant increases in bifidobacteria compared with baseline specimens or the H+B group; however, many of the infants did not receive the highest doses of GOS and HMO, and antibiotic use in the H+H group was high.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-360
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Prebiotics
Oligosaccharides
Premature Infants
Health Maintenance Organizations
Human Milk
Bifidobacterium
Tissue Donors
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Proteobacteria
Infant Formula
Clostridium
Lactobacillus
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Milk
Mothers
Diet
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • All-human diet
  • Galacto-oligosaccharide
  • Human milk oligosaccharide
  • Late-onset sepsis
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants. / Underwood, Mark; Kalanetra, Karen M.; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mirmiran, Majid; Barile, Daniela; Tancredi, Daniel J; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Mills, David A.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Vol. 58, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 352-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Underwood, M, Kalanetra, KM, Bokulich, NA, Mirmiran, M, Barile, D, Tancredi, DJ, German, JB, Lebrilla, CB & Mills, DA 2014, 'Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 352-360. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000000211
Underwood, Mark ; Kalanetra, Karen M. ; Bokulich, Nicholas A. ; Mirmiran, Majid ; Barile, Daniela ; Tancredi, Daniel J ; German, J. Bruce ; Lebrilla, Carlito B ; Mills, David A. / Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 352-360.
@article{05c0ace40f5d41beac67b05130f8a676,
title = "Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of increasing doses of 2 prebiotic oligosaccharides and of an {"}all-human diet{"} on the intestinal microbiota of premature infants. METHODS:: Twelve premature infants receiving formula feedings were randomly assigned to receive either galacto-oligosaccharide (F+GOS) or a pooled concentrated donor human milk product containing human milk oligosaccharides (F+HMO) in increasing doses during a 5-week period. A second group of 15 premature infants received their mother{\^E}s own milk fortified with either a concentrated donor human milk product (H+H) or a bovine powdered fortifier (H+B). Serial stool specimens from each infant were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial composition. RESULTS:: All of the infants studied had relatively low levels of bifidobacteria and no measurable Lactobacilli. Infants from the F+GOS and F+HMO groups demonstrated an increase in relative numbers of Clostridia with increasing doses. Compared with the H+B group, the infants in the F+HMO and the H+H groups showed an unexpected trend toward an increase in γ-Proteobacteria over time/dose. Principal coordinate analyses and Shannon diversity scores were not significantly different among the 4 groups. Infants in the H+H group received more antibiotics during the study period than those in the other groups. Two of the infants receiving GOS developed feeding intolerance. CONCLUSIONS:: None of the prebiotic interventions resulted in significant increases in bifidobacteria compared with baseline specimens or the H+B group; however, many of the infants did not receive the highest doses of GOS and HMO, and antibiotic use in the H+H group was high.",
keywords = "All-human diet, Galacto-oligosaccharide, Human milk oligosaccharide, Late-onset sepsis, Necrotizing enterocolitis",
author = "Mark Underwood and Kalanetra, {Karen M.} and Bokulich, {Nicholas A.} and Majid Mirmiran and Daniela Barile and Tancredi, {Daniel J} and German, {J. Bruce} and Lebrilla, {Carlito B} and Mills, {David A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1097/MPG.0000000000000211",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "352--360",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition",
issn = "0277-2116",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prebiotic oligosaccharides in premature infants

AU - Underwood, Mark

AU - Kalanetra, Karen M.

AU - Bokulich, Nicholas A.

AU - Mirmiran, Majid

AU - Barile, Daniela

AU - Tancredi, Daniel J

AU - German, J. Bruce

AU - Lebrilla, Carlito B

AU - Mills, David A.

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE:: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of increasing doses of 2 prebiotic oligosaccharides and of an "all-human diet" on the intestinal microbiota of premature infants. METHODS:: Twelve premature infants receiving formula feedings were randomly assigned to receive either galacto-oligosaccharide (F+GOS) or a pooled concentrated donor human milk product containing human milk oligosaccharides (F+HMO) in increasing doses during a 5-week period. A second group of 15 premature infants received their motherÊs own milk fortified with either a concentrated donor human milk product (H+H) or a bovine powdered fortifier (H+B). Serial stool specimens from each infant were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial composition. RESULTS:: All of the infants studied had relatively low levels of bifidobacteria and no measurable Lactobacilli. Infants from the F+GOS and F+HMO groups demonstrated an increase in relative numbers of Clostridia with increasing doses. Compared with the H+B group, the infants in the F+HMO and the H+H groups showed an unexpected trend toward an increase in γ-Proteobacteria over time/dose. Principal coordinate analyses and Shannon diversity scores were not significantly different among the 4 groups. Infants in the H+H group received more antibiotics during the study period than those in the other groups. Two of the infants receiving GOS developed feeding intolerance. CONCLUSIONS:: None of the prebiotic interventions resulted in significant increases in bifidobacteria compared with baseline specimens or the H+B group; however, many of the infants did not receive the highest doses of GOS and HMO, and antibiotic use in the H+H group was high.

AB - OBJECTIVE:: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of increasing doses of 2 prebiotic oligosaccharides and of an "all-human diet" on the intestinal microbiota of premature infants. METHODS:: Twelve premature infants receiving formula feedings were randomly assigned to receive either galacto-oligosaccharide (F+GOS) or a pooled concentrated donor human milk product containing human milk oligosaccharides (F+HMO) in increasing doses during a 5-week period. A second group of 15 premature infants received their motherÊs own milk fortified with either a concentrated donor human milk product (H+H) or a bovine powdered fortifier (H+B). Serial stool specimens from each infant were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial composition. RESULTS:: All of the infants studied had relatively low levels of bifidobacteria and no measurable Lactobacilli. Infants from the F+GOS and F+HMO groups demonstrated an increase in relative numbers of Clostridia with increasing doses. Compared with the H+B group, the infants in the F+HMO and the H+H groups showed an unexpected trend toward an increase in γ-Proteobacteria over time/dose. Principal coordinate analyses and Shannon diversity scores were not significantly different among the 4 groups. Infants in the H+H group received more antibiotics during the study period than those in the other groups. Two of the infants receiving GOS developed feeding intolerance. CONCLUSIONS:: None of the prebiotic interventions resulted in significant increases in bifidobacteria compared with baseline specimens or the H+B group; however, many of the infants did not receive the highest doses of GOS and HMO, and antibiotic use in the H+H group was high.

KW - All-human diet

KW - Galacto-oligosaccharide

KW - Human milk oligosaccharide

KW - Late-onset sepsis

KW - Necrotizing enterocolitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896702139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896702139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000211

DO - 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000211

M3 - Article

C2 - 24135979

AN - SCOPUS:84896702139

VL - 58

SP - 352

EP - 360

JO - Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

JF - Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

SN - 0277-2116

IS - 3

ER -