Potential toxicity of Up-converting nanoparticles encapsulated with a bilayer formed by ligand attraction

Gautom K. Das, Daniel T. Stark, Ian M. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cellular toxicity of nanoparticles that were capped with a bilayered ligand was studied using an up-converting (UC) phosphor material as a representative nanoparticle (NP). The results indicate that although UC NPs are known to be nontoxic, the toxicity of the NPs depends strongly on ligand coordination conditions, in addition to the other commonly known parameters such as size, structure, surface charge etc. Oleate-capped hydrophobic NaYF 4:Yb,Er NPs were surface modified to yield three extreme conditions: bare particles that were stripped of the oleate ligands; particles with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands; and particles with an bilayer of PEG-oleate ligands using the oleate surface group that was remained after synthesis. It was found that the bare particles and the covalent PEG NPs induced little toxicity. However, particles that were rendered biocompatible by forming a bilayer with an amphiphilic ligand (i.e., PEG-oleate) resulted in significant cell toxicity. These findings strongly suggest that the PEG-oleate group dissociated from the bilayered oleate-capped NPs, resulting in significant toxicity by exposing the hydrophobic oleate-capped NPs to the cell. Based on results with bare particles, the NaLnF4:Yb,Er (Ln = Y, Gd) up-converting phosphors are essentially less-toxic. Capping and functionalizing these particles with ligand intercalation may, however, not be a suitable method for rendering the NPs suitable for bioapplication as the ligand can potentially dissociate upon cellular interaction, leading to significant toxicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8167-8176
Number of pages10
JournalLangmuir
Volume30
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2014

Fingerprint

Oleic Acid
toxicity
attraction
Toxicity
Ligands
Polyethylene glycols
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
ligands
Phosphors
phosphors
Poisons
Surface charge
Intercalation
cells
intercalation
glycols
ethylene
synthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Potential toxicity of Up-converting nanoparticles encapsulated with a bilayer formed by ligand attraction. / Das, Gautom K.; Stark, Daniel T.; Kennedy, Ian M.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 30, No. 27, 15.07.2014, p. 8167-8176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Das, Gautom K. ; Stark, Daniel T. ; Kennedy, Ian M. / Potential toxicity of Up-converting nanoparticles encapsulated with a bilayer formed by ligand attraction. In: Langmuir. 2014 ; Vol. 30, No. 27. pp. 8167-8176.
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