Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults

Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Aruna Kamineni, Jane A. Cauley, John A Robbins, Linda F. Fried, David S. Siscovick, Tamara B. Harris, Anne B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N = 5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years) were followed 10.9±4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG) ≥ 126mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years) were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9-20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1-12.9) and BMI ≥ 25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.71-1.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6-7.7), but similar for BMI ≥ 30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01-1.78). PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92-1.57)) and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04-1.10)) modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87-1.57)). Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number979270
JournalCurrent Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Hip Fractures
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Hypoglycemic Agents
Ankle
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Medical Records
Fasting
Arm
Glucose
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Strotmeyer, E. S., Kamineni, A., Cauley, J. A., Robbins, J. A., Fried, L. F., Siscovick, D. S., ... Newman, A. B. (2011). Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults. Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, 2011, [979270]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/979270

Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults. / Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Kamineni, Aruna; Cauley, Jane A.; Robbins, John A; Fried, Linda F.; Siscovick, David S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B.

In: Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, Vol. 2011, 979270, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strotmeyer, ES, Kamineni, A, Cauley, JA, Robbins, JA, Fried, LF, Siscovick, DS, Harris, TB & Newman, AB 2011, 'Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults', Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, vol. 2011, 979270. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/979270
Strotmeyer, Elsa S. ; Kamineni, Aruna ; Cauley, Jane A. ; Robbins, John A ; Fried, Linda F. ; Siscovick, David S. ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Newman, Anne B. / Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults. In: Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research. 2011 ; Vol. 2011.
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