Postprandial metabolic response of breast-fed infants and infants fed lactose-free vs regular infant formula: A randomized controlled trial

Carolyn M. Slupsky, Xuan He, Olle Hernell, Yvonne Andersson, Colin Rudolph, Bo Lönnerdal, Christina E. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactose intolerance is a major concern driving the growth of lactose-free foods including lactose-free infant formula. It is unknown what the metabolic consequence is of consumption of a formula where lactose has been replaced with corn syrup solids (CSS). Here, a randomized double-blinded intervention study was conducted where exclusively formula-fed infants were fed formula containing either lactose or CSS-based infant formula and compared with an equal number of exclusively breast-fed infants. Plasma metabolites and insulin were measured at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding. Differences in plasma metabolite profiles for formula-fed infants included a rapid increase in circulating amino acids, creatinine and urea compared with breast-fed infants. At 120 min post-feeding, insulin was significantly elevated in formula-fed compared with breast-fed infants. Infants fed lactose-based formula had the highest levels of glucose at 120 min, and leucine, isoleucine, valine and proline at 90 and 120 min, whereas infants fed CSS-based formula had the lowest levels of non-esterified fatty acids at all time points, and glucose at 120 min. Overall, these differences highlight that changes in infant formula composition impact infant metabolism, and show that metabolomics is a powerful tool to help with development of improved infant formulas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3640
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Infant Formula
Lactose
Breast
Randomized Controlled Trials
Zea mays
Insulin
Lactose Intolerance
Glucose
Metabolomics
Isoleucine
Valine
Proline
Leucine
Urea
Creatinine
Fatty Acids
Amino Acids
Food
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Postprandial metabolic response of breast-fed infants and infants fed lactose-free vs regular infant formula : A randomized controlled trial. / Slupsky, Carolyn M.; He, Xuan; Hernell, Olle; Andersson, Yvonne; Rudolph, Colin; Lönnerdal, Bo; West, Christina E.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 3640, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slupsky, Carolyn M. ; He, Xuan ; Hernell, Olle ; Andersson, Yvonne ; Rudolph, Colin ; Lönnerdal, Bo ; West, Christina E. / Postprandial metabolic response of breast-fed infants and infants fed lactose-free vs regular infant formula : A randomized controlled trial. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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