Postangiographic femoral artery injuries: Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression

Brian D. Fellmeth, Anne C. Roberts, Joseph J. Bookstein, Julie A. Freischlag, John R. Forsythe, Nancy K. Buckner, Robert J. Hye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

384 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ultrasound-guided compression repair (UGCR) of catheterization-related femoral artery injuries was evaluated as a possible new imaging-guided interventional procedure. Thirty-nine femoral artery injuries (35 pseudoaneurysms, four arteriovenous fistulas) were detected with color Doppler flow imaging in patients with enlarging groin hematomas and/or groin bruits 6 hours to 14 days after catheterization procedures. UGCR was not performed in 10 patients due to spontaneous thrombosis (n = 4), infection (n = 1) or skin ischemia (n = 1), unsuitable anatomy (n = 3), or excessive discomfort (n = 1). The remaining 29 patients underwent a full trial of compression therapy, and the lesion was eliminated in 27. Follow-up color flow scans were obtained after 24-72 hours in all 27 successful cases and at 1-15 months in 19; no recurrences or complications occurred. UGCR for acute injuries is safe and technically simple and is promising as a cost-effective, first-line treatment for uncomplicated catheterization-related femoral artery injuries. UGCR is probably not appropriate for long-standing injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-675
Number of pages5
JournalRadiology
Volume178
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1991

Fingerprint

Femoral Artery
Catheterization
Wounds and Injuries
Groin
Color
False Aneurysm
Arteriovenous Fistula
Hematoma
Anatomy
Thrombosis
Ischemia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Recurrence
Skin
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • Aneurysm, femoral, 921.732
  • Angiography, complications, 921.122, 921.494, 921.732
  • Arteries, injuries, 921.494, 921.732
  • Arteries, US studies, 921.12984
  • Fistula, arteriovenous, 921.494
  • Ultrasound (US), guidance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Fellmeth, B. D., Roberts, A. C., Bookstein, J. J., Freischlag, J. A., Forsythe, J. R., Buckner, N. K., & Hye, R. J. (1991). Postangiographic femoral artery injuries: Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression. Radiology, 178(3), 671-675.

Postangiographic femoral artery injuries : Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression. / Fellmeth, Brian D.; Roberts, Anne C.; Bookstein, Joseph J.; Freischlag, Julie A.; Forsythe, John R.; Buckner, Nancy K.; Hye, Robert J.

In: Radiology, Vol. 178, No. 3, 03.1991, p. 671-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fellmeth, BD, Roberts, AC, Bookstein, JJ, Freischlag, JA, Forsythe, JR, Buckner, NK & Hye, RJ 1991, 'Postangiographic femoral artery injuries: Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression', Radiology, vol. 178, no. 3, pp. 671-675.
Fellmeth BD, Roberts AC, Bookstein JJ, Freischlag JA, Forsythe JR, Buckner NK et al. Postangiographic femoral artery injuries: Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression. Radiology. 1991 Mar;178(3):671-675.
Fellmeth, Brian D. ; Roberts, Anne C. ; Bookstein, Joseph J. ; Freischlag, Julie A. ; Forsythe, John R. ; Buckner, Nancy K. ; Hye, Robert J. / Postangiographic femoral artery injuries : Nonsurgical repair with US-guided compression. In: Radiology. 1991 ; Vol. 178, No. 3. pp. 671-675.
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